g r o t t o 1 1

Peeve Farm
Breeding peeves for show, not just to keep as pets
Brian Tiemann
Silicon ValleyNew York-based purveyor of a confusing mixture of Apple punditry, political bile, and sports car rentals.

btman at grotto11 dot com

Read These Too:

InstaPundit
Steven Den Beste
James Lileks
Little Green Footballs
As the Apple Turns
Entropicana
Cold Fury
Capitalist Lion
Red Letter Day
Eric S. Raymond
Tal G in Jerusalem
Aziz Poonawalla
Corsair the Rational Pirate
.clue
Ravishing Light
Rosenblog
Cartago Delenda Est



Cars without compromise.





Book Plugs:




Buy 'em and I get
money. I think.
BSD Mall




 4/21/2014 -  4/21/2014
 4/14/2014 -  4/20/2014
  4/7/2014 -  4/13/2014
 3/31/2014 -   4/6/2014
 3/24/2014 -  3/30/2014
 3/17/2014 -  3/23/2014
 3/10/2014 -  3/16/2014
  3/3/2014 -   3/9/2014
 2/24/2014 -   3/2/2014
 2/17/2014 -  2/23/2014
 2/10/2014 -  2/16/2014
  2/3/2014 -   2/9/2014
 1/27/2014 -   2/2/2014
 1/20/2014 -  1/26/2014
 1/13/2014 -  1/19/2014
  1/6/2014 -  1/12/2014
12/30/2013 -   1/5/2014
12/23/2013 - 12/29/2013
12/16/2013 - 12/22/2013
 12/9/2013 - 12/15/2013
 12/2/2013 -  12/8/2013
11/25/2013 -  12/1/2013
11/18/2013 - 11/24/2013
11/11/2013 - 11/17/2013
 11/4/2013 - 11/10/2013
10/28/2013 -  11/3/2013
10/21/2013 - 10/27/2013
10/14/2013 - 10/20/2013
 10/7/2013 - 10/13/2013
 9/30/2013 -  10/6/2013
 9/23/2013 -  9/29/2013
 9/16/2013 -  9/22/2013
  9/9/2013 -  9/15/2013
  9/2/2013 -   9/8/2013
 8/26/2013 -   9/1/2013
 8/19/2013 -  8/25/2013
 8/12/2013 -  8/18/2013
  8/5/2013 -  8/11/2013
 7/29/2013 -   8/4/2013
 7/22/2013 -  7/28/2013
 7/15/2013 -  7/21/2013
  7/8/2013 -  7/14/2013
  7/1/2013 -   7/7/2013
 6/24/2013 -  6/30/2013
 6/17/2013 -  6/23/2013
 6/10/2013 -  6/16/2013
  6/3/2013 -   6/9/2013
 5/27/2013 -   6/2/2013
 5/20/2013 -  5/26/2013
 5/13/2013 -  5/19/2013
  5/6/2013 -  5/12/2013
 4/29/2013 -   5/5/2013
 4/22/2013 -  4/28/2013
 4/15/2013 -  4/21/2013
  4/8/2013 -  4/14/2013
  4/1/2013 -   4/7/2013
 3/25/2013 -  3/31/2013
 3/18/2013 -  3/24/2013
 3/11/2013 -  3/17/2013
  3/4/2013 -  3/10/2013
 2/25/2013 -   3/3/2013
 2/18/2013 -  2/24/2013
 2/11/2013 -  2/17/2013
  2/4/2013 -  2/10/2013
 1/28/2013 -   2/3/2013
 1/21/2013 -  1/27/2013
 1/14/2013 -  1/20/2013
  1/7/2013 -  1/13/2013
12/31/2012 -   1/6/2013
12/24/2012 - 12/30/2012
12/17/2012 - 12/23/2012
12/10/2012 - 12/16/2012
 12/3/2012 -  12/9/2012
11/26/2012 -  12/2/2012
11/19/2012 - 11/25/2012
11/12/2012 - 11/18/2012
 11/5/2012 - 11/11/2012
10/29/2012 -  11/4/2012
10/22/2012 - 10/28/2012
10/15/2012 - 10/21/2012
 10/8/2012 - 10/14/2012
 10/1/2012 -  10/7/2012
 9/24/2012 -  9/30/2012
 9/17/2012 -  9/23/2012
 9/10/2012 -  9/16/2012
  9/3/2012 -   9/9/2012
 8/27/2012 -   9/2/2012
 8/20/2012 -  8/26/2012
 8/13/2012 -  8/19/2012
  8/6/2012 -  8/12/2012
 7/30/2012 -   8/5/2012
 7/23/2012 -  7/29/2012
 7/16/2012 -  7/22/2012
  7/9/2012 -  7/15/2012
  7/2/2012 -   7/8/2012
 6/25/2012 -   7/1/2012
 6/18/2012 -  6/24/2012
 6/11/2012 -  6/17/2012
  6/4/2012 -  6/10/2012
 5/28/2012 -   6/3/2012
 5/21/2012 -  5/27/2012
 5/14/2012 -  5/20/2012
  5/7/2012 -  5/13/2012
 4/30/2012 -   5/6/2012
 4/23/2012 -  4/29/2012
 4/16/2012 -  4/22/2012
  4/9/2012 -  4/15/2012
  4/2/2012 -   4/8/2012
 3/26/2012 -   4/1/2012
 3/19/2012 -  3/25/2012
 3/12/2012 -  3/18/2012
  3/5/2012 -  3/11/2012
 2/27/2012 -   3/4/2012
 2/20/2012 -  2/26/2012
 2/13/2012 -  2/19/2012
  2/6/2012 -  2/12/2012
 1/30/2012 -   2/5/2012
 1/23/2012 -  1/29/2012
 1/16/2012 -  1/22/2012
  1/9/2012 -  1/15/2012
  1/2/2012 -   1/8/2012
12/26/2011 -   1/1/2011
12/19/2011 - 12/25/2011
12/12/2011 - 12/18/2011
 12/5/2011 - 12/11/2011
11/28/2011 -  12/4/2011
11/21/2011 - 11/27/2011
11/14/2011 - 11/20/2011
 11/7/2011 - 11/13/2011
10/31/2011 -  11/6/2011
10/24/2011 - 10/30/2011
10/17/2011 - 10/23/2011
10/10/2011 - 10/16/2011
 10/3/2011 -  10/9/2011
 9/26/2011 -  10/2/2011
 9/19/2011 -  9/25/2011
 9/12/2011 -  9/18/2011
  9/5/2011 -  9/11/2011
 8/29/2011 -   9/4/2011
 8/22/2011 -  8/28/2011
 8/15/2011 -  8/21/2011
  8/8/2011 -  8/14/2011
  8/1/2011 -   8/7/2011
 7/25/2011 -  7/31/2011
 7/18/2011 -  7/24/2011
 7/11/2011 -  7/17/2011
  7/4/2011 -  7/10/2011
 6/27/2011 -   7/3/2011
 6/20/2011 -  6/26/2011
 6/13/2011 -  6/19/2011
  6/6/2011 -  6/12/2011
 5/30/2011 -   6/5/2011
 5/23/2011 -  5/29/2011
 5/16/2011 -  5/22/2011
  5/9/2011 -  5/15/2011
  5/2/2011 -   5/8/2011
 4/25/2011 -   5/1/2011
 4/18/2011 -  4/24/2011
 4/11/2011 -  4/17/2011
  4/4/2011 -  4/10/2011
 3/28/2011 -   4/3/2011
 3/21/2011 -  3/27/2011
 3/14/2011 -  3/20/2011
  3/7/2011 -  3/13/2011
 2/28/2011 -   3/6/2011
 2/21/2011 -  2/27/2011
 2/14/2011 -  2/20/2011
  2/7/2011 -  2/13/2011
 1/31/2011 -   2/6/2011
 1/24/2011 -  1/30/2011
 1/17/2011 -  1/23/2011
 1/10/2011 -  1/16/2011
  1/3/2011 -   1/9/2011
12/27/2010 -   1/2/2010
12/20/2010 - 12/26/2010
12/13/2010 - 12/19/2010
 12/6/2010 - 12/12/2010
11/29/2010 -  12/5/2010
11/22/2010 - 11/28/2010
11/15/2010 - 11/21/2010
 11/8/2010 - 11/14/2010
 11/1/2010 -  11/7/2010
10/25/2010 - 10/31/2010
10/18/2010 - 10/24/2010
10/11/2010 - 10/17/2010
 10/4/2010 - 10/10/2010
 9/27/2010 -  10/3/2010
 9/20/2010 -  9/26/2010
 9/13/2010 -  9/19/2010
  9/6/2010 -  9/12/2010
 8/30/2010 -   9/5/2010
 8/23/2010 -  8/29/2010
 8/16/2010 -  8/22/2010
  8/9/2010 -  8/15/2010
  8/2/2010 -   8/8/2010
 7/26/2010 -   8/1/2010
 7/19/2010 -  7/25/2010
 7/12/2010 -  7/18/2010
  7/5/2010 -  7/11/2010
 6/28/2010 -   7/4/2010
 6/21/2010 -  6/27/2010
 6/14/2010 -  6/20/2010
  6/7/2010 -  6/13/2010
 5/31/2010 -   6/6/2010
 5/24/2010 -  5/30/2010
 5/17/2010 -  5/23/2010
 5/10/2010 -  5/16/2010
  5/3/2010 -   5/9/2010
 4/26/2010 -   5/2/2010
 4/19/2010 -  4/25/2010
 4/12/2010 -  4/18/2010
  4/5/2010 -  4/11/2010
 3/29/2010 -   4/4/2010
 3/22/2010 -  3/28/2010
 3/15/2010 -  3/21/2010
  3/8/2010 -  3/14/2010
  3/1/2010 -   3/7/2010
 2/22/2010 -  2/28/2010
 2/15/2010 -  2/21/2010
  2/8/2010 -  2/14/2010
  2/1/2010 -   2/7/2010
 1/25/2010 -  1/31/2010
 1/18/2010 -  1/24/2010
 1/11/2010 -  1/17/2010
  1/4/2010 -  1/10/2010
12/28/2009 -   1/3/2009
12/21/2009 - 12/27/2009
12/14/2009 - 12/20/2009
 12/7/2009 - 12/13/2009
11/30/2009 -  12/6/2009
11/23/2009 - 11/29/2009
11/16/2009 - 11/22/2009
 11/9/2009 - 11/15/2009
 11/2/2009 -  11/8/2009
10/26/2009 -  11/1/2009
10/19/2009 - 10/25/2009
10/12/2009 - 10/18/2009
 10/5/2009 - 10/11/2009
 9/28/2009 -  10/4/2009
 9/21/2009 -  9/27/2009
 9/14/2009 -  9/20/2009
  9/7/2009 -  9/13/2009
 8/31/2009 -   9/6/2009
 8/24/2009 -  8/30/2009
 8/17/2009 -  8/23/2009
 8/10/2009 -  8/16/2009
  8/3/2009 -   8/9/2009
 7/27/2009 -   8/2/2009
 7/20/2009 -  7/26/2009
 7/13/2009 -  7/19/2009
  7/6/2009 -  7/12/2009
 6/29/2009 -   7/5/2009
 6/22/2009 -  6/28/2009
 6/15/2009 -  6/21/2009
  6/8/2009 -  6/14/2009
  6/1/2009 -   6/7/2009
 5/25/2009 -  5/31/2009
 5/18/2009 -  5/24/2009
 5/11/2009 -  5/17/2009
  5/4/2009 -  5/10/2009
 4/27/2009 -   5/3/2009
 4/20/2009 -  4/26/2009
 4/13/2009 -  4/19/2009
  4/6/2009 -  4/12/2009
 3/30/2009 -   4/5/2009
 3/23/2009 -  3/29/2009
 3/16/2009 -  3/22/2009
  3/9/2009 -  3/15/2009
  3/2/2009 -   3/8/2009
 2/23/2009 -   3/1/2009
 2/16/2009 -  2/22/2009
  2/9/2009 -  2/15/2009
  2/2/2009 -   2/8/2009
 1/26/2009 -   2/1/2009
 1/19/2009 -  1/25/2009
 1/12/2009 -  1/18/2009
  1/5/2009 -  1/11/2009
12/29/2008 -   1/4/2009
12/22/2008 - 12/28/2008
12/15/2008 - 12/21/2008
 12/8/2008 - 12/14/2008
 12/1/2008 -  12/7/2008
11/24/2008 - 11/30/2008
11/17/2008 - 11/23/2008
11/10/2008 - 11/16/2008
 11/3/2008 -  11/9/2008
10/27/2008 -  11/2/2008
10/20/2008 - 10/26/2008
10/13/2008 - 10/19/2008
 10/6/2008 - 10/12/2008
 9/29/2008 -  10/5/2008
 9/22/2008 -  9/28/2008
 9/15/2008 -  9/21/2008
  9/8/2008 -  9/14/2008
  9/1/2008 -   9/7/2008
 8/25/2008 -  8/31/2008
 8/18/2008 -  8/24/2008
 8/11/2008 -  8/17/2008
  8/4/2008 -  8/10/2008
 7/28/2008 -   8/3/2008
 7/21/2008 -  7/27/2008
 7/14/2008 -  7/20/2008
  7/7/2008 -  7/13/2008
 6/30/2008 -   7/6/2008
 6/23/2008 -  6/29/2008
 6/16/2008 -  6/22/2008
  6/9/2008 -  6/15/2008
  6/2/2008 -   6/8/2008
 5/26/2008 -   6/1/2008
 5/19/2008 -  5/25/2008
 5/12/2008 -  5/18/2008
  5/5/2008 -  5/11/2008
 4/28/2008 -   5/4/2008
 4/21/2008 -  4/27/2008
 4/14/2008 -  4/20/2008
  4/7/2008 -  4/13/2008
 3/31/2008 -   4/6/2008
 3/24/2008 -  3/30/2008
 3/17/2008 -  3/23/2008
 3/10/2008 -  3/16/2008
  3/3/2008 -   3/9/2008
 2/25/2008 -   3/2/2008
 2/18/2008 -  2/24/2008
 2/11/2008 -  2/17/2008
  2/4/2008 -  2/10/2008
 1/28/2008 -   2/3/2008
 1/21/2008 -  1/27/2008
 1/14/2008 -  1/20/2008
  1/7/2008 -  1/13/2008
12/31/2007 -   1/6/2008
12/24/2007 - 12/30/2007
12/17/2007 - 12/23/2007
12/10/2007 - 12/16/2007
 12/3/2007 -  12/9/2007
11/26/2007 -  12/2/2007
11/19/2007 - 11/25/2007
11/12/2007 - 11/18/2007
 11/5/2007 - 11/11/2007
10/29/2007 -  11/4/2007
10/22/2007 - 10/28/2007
10/15/2007 - 10/21/2007
 10/8/2007 - 10/14/2007
 10/1/2007 -  10/7/2007
 9/24/2007 -  9/30/2007
 9/17/2007 -  9/23/2007
 9/10/2007 -  9/16/2007
  9/3/2007 -   9/9/2007
 8/27/2007 -   9/2/2007
 8/20/2007 -  8/26/2007
 8/13/2007 -  8/19/2007
  8/6/2007 -  8/12/2007
 7/30/2007 -   8/5/2007
 7/23/2007 -  7/29/2007
 7/16/2007 -  7/22/2007
  7/9/2007 -  7/15/2007
  7/2/2007 -   7/8/2007
 6/25/2007 -   7/1/2007
 6/18/2007 -  6/24/2007
 6/11/2007 -  6/17/2007
  6/4/2007 -  6/10/2007
 5/28/2007 -   6/3/2007
 5/21/2007 -  5/27/2007
 5/14/2007 -  5/20/2007
  5/7/2007 -  5/13/2007
 4/30/2007 -   5/6/2007
 4/23/2007 -  4/29/2007
 4/16/2007 -  4/22/2007
  4/9/2007 -  4/15/2007
  4/2/2007 -   4/8/2007
 3/26/2007 -   4/1/2007
 3/19/2007 -  3/25/2007
 3/12/2007 -  3/18/2007
  3/5/2007 -  3/11/2007
 2/26/2007 -   3/4/2007
 2/19/2007 -  2/25/2007
 2/12/2007 -  2/18/2007
  2/5/2007 -  2/11/2007
 1/29/2007 -   2/4/2007
 1/22/2007 -  1/28/2007
 1/15/2007 -  1/21/2007
  1/8/2007 -  1/14/2007
  1/1/2007 -   1/7/2007
12/25/2006 - 12/31/2006
12/18/2006 - 12/24/2006
12/11/2006 - 12/17/2006
 12/4/2006 - 12/10/2006
11/27/2006 -  12/3/2006
11/20/2006 - 11/26/2006
11/13/2006 - 11/19/2006
 11/6/2006 - 11/12/2006
10/30/2006 -  11/5/2006
10/23/2006 - 10/29/2006
10/16/2006 - 10/22/2006
 10/9/2006 - 10/15/2006
 10/2/2006 -  10/8/2006
 9/25/2006 -  10/1/2006
 9/18/2006 -  9/24/2006
 9/11/2006 -  9/17/2006
  9/4/2006 -  9/10/2006
 8/28/2006 -   9/3/2006
 8/21/2006 -  8/27/2006
 8/14/2006 -  8/20/2006
  8/7/2006 -  8/13/2006
 7/31/2006 -   8/6/2006
 7/24/2006 -  7/30/2006
 7/17/2006 -  7/23/2006
 7/10/2006 -  7/16/2006
  7/3/2006 -   7/9/2006
 6/26/2006 -   7/2/2006
 6/19/2006 -  6/25/2006
 6/12/2006 -  6/18/2006
  6/5/2006 -  6/11/2006
 5/29/2006 -   6/4/2006
 5/22/2006 -  5/28/2006
 5/15/2006 -  5/21/2006
  5/8/2006 -  5/14/2006
  5/1/2006 -   5/7/2006
 4/24/2006 -  4/30/2006
 4/17/2006 -  4/23/2006
 4/10/2006 -  4/16/2006
  4/3/2006 -   4/9/2006
 3/27/2006 -   4/2/2006
 3/20/2006 -  3/26/2006
 3/13/2006 -  3/19/2006
  3/6/2006 -  3/12/2006
 2/27/2006 -   3/5/2006
 2/20/2006 -  2/26/2006
 2/13/2006 -  2/19/2006
  2/6/2006 -  2/12/2006
 1/30/2006 -   2/5/2006
 1/23/2006 -  1/29/2006
 1/16/2006 -  1/22/2006
  1/9/2006 -  1/15/2006
  1/2/2006 -   1/8/2006
12/26/2005 -   1/1/2005
12/19/2005 - 12/25/2005
12/12/2005 - 12/18/2005
 12/5/2005 - 12/11/2005
11/28/2005 -  12/4/2005
11/21/2005 - 11/27/2005
11/14/2005 - 11/20/2005
 11/7/2005 - 11/13/2005
10/31/2005 -  11/6/2005
10/24/2005 - 10/30/2005
10/17/2005 - 10/23/2005
10/10/2005 - 10/16/2005
 10/3/2005 -  10/9/2005
 9/26/2005 -  10/2/2005
 9/19/2005 -  9/25/2005
 9/12/2005 -  9/18/2005
  9/5/2005 -  9/11/2005
 8/29/2005 -   9/4/2005
 8/22/2005 -  8/28/2005
 8/15/2005 -  8/21/2005
  8/8/2005 -  8/14/2005
  8/1/2005 -   8/7/2005
 7/25/2005 -  7/31/2005
 7/18/2005 -  7/24/2005
 7/11/2005 -  7/17/2005
  7/4/2005 -  7/10/2005
 6/27/2005 -   7/3/2005
 6/20/2005 -  6/26/2005
 6/13/2005 -  6/19/2005
  6/6/2005 -  6/12/2005
 5/30/2005 -   6/5/2005
 5/23/2005 -  5/29/2005
 5/16/2005 -  5/22/2005
  5/9/2005 -  5/15/2005
  5/2/2005 -   5/8/2005
 4/25/2005 -   5/1/2005
 4/18/2005 -  4/24/2005
 4/11/2005 -  4/17/2005
  4/4/2005 -  4/10/2005
 3/28/2005 -   4/3/2005
 3/21/2005 -  3/27/2005
 3/14/2005 -  3/20/2005
  3/7/2005 -  3/13/2005
 2/28/2005 -   3/6/2005
 2/21/2005 -  2/27/2005
 2/14/2005 -  2/20/2005
  2/7/2005 -  2/13/2005
 1/31/2005 -   2/6/2005
 1/24/2005 -  1/30/2005
 1/17/2005 -  1/23/2005
 1/10/2005 -  1/16/2005
  1/3/2005 -   1/9/2005
12/27/2004 -   1/2/2004
12/20/2004 - 12/26/2004
12/13/2004 - 12/19/2004
 12/6/2004 - 12/12/2004
11/29/2004 -  12/5/2004
11/22/2004 - 11/28/2004
11/15/2004 - 11/21/2004
 11/8/2004 - 11/14/2004
 11/1/2004 -  11/7/2004
10/25/2004 - 10/31/2004
10/18/2004 - 10/24/2004
10/11/2004 - 10/17/2004
 10/4/2004 - 10/10/2004
 9/27/2004 -  10/3/2004
 9/20/2004 -  9/26/2004
 9/13/2004 -  9/19/2004
  9/6/2004 -  9/12/2004
 8/30/2004 -   9/5/2004
 8/23/2004 -  8/29/2004
 8/16/2004 -  8/22/2004
  8/9/2004 -  8/15/2004
  8/2/2004 -   8/8/2004
 7/26/2004 -   8/1/2004
 7/19/2004 -  7/25/2004
 7/12/2004 -  7/18/2004
  7/5/2004 -  7/11/2004
 6/28/2004 -   7/4/2004
 6/21/2004 -  6/27/2004
 6/14/2004 -  6/20/2004
  6/7/2004 -  6/13/2004
 5/31/2004 -   6/6/2004
 5/24/2004 -  5/30/2004
 5/17/2004 -  5/23/2004
 5/10/2004 -  5/16/2004
  5/3/2004 -   5/9/2004
 4/26/2004 -   5/2/2004
 4/19/2004 -  4/25/2004
 4/12/2004 -  4/18/2004
  4/5/2004 -  4/11/2004
 3/29/2004 -   4/4/2004
 3/22/2004 -  3/28/2004
 3/15/2004 -  3/21/2004
  3/8/2004 -  3/14/2004
  3/1/2004 -   3/7/2004
 2/23/2004 -  2/29/2004
 2/16/2004 -  2/22/2004
  2/9/2004 -  2/15/2004
  2/2/2004 -   2/8/2004
 1/26/2004 -   2/1/2004
 1/19/2004 -  1/25/2004
 1/12/2004 -  1/18/2004
  1/5/2004 -  1/11/2004
12/29/2003 -   1/4/2004
12/22/2003 - 12/28/2003
12/15/2003 - 12/21/2003
 12/8/2003 - 12/14/2003
 12/1/2003 -  12/7/2003
11/24/2003 - 11/30/2003
11/17/2003 - 11/23/2003
11/10/2003 - 11/16/2003
 11/3/2003 -  11/9/2003
10/27/2003 -  11/2/2003
10/20/2003 - 10/26/2003
10/13/2003 - 10/19/2003
 10/6/2003 - 10/12/2003
 9/29/2003 -  10/5/2003
 9/22/2003 -  9/28/2003
 9/15/2003 -  9/21/2003
  9/8/2003 -  9/14/2003
  9/1/2003 -   9/7/2003
 8/25/2003 -  8/31/2003
 8/18/2003 -  8/24/2003
 8/11/2003 -  8/17/2003
  8/4/2003 -  8/10/2003
 7/28/2003 -   8/3/2003
 7/21/2003 -  7/27/2003
 7/14/2003 -  7/20/2003
  7/7/2003 -  7/13/2003
 6/30/2003 -   7/6/2003
 6/23/2003 -  6/29/2003
 6/16/2003 -  6/22/2003
  6/9/2003 -  6/15/2003
  6/2/2003 -   6/8/2003
 5/26/2003 -   6/1/2003
 5/19/2003 -  5/25/2003
 5/12/2003 -  5/18/2003
  5/5/2003 -  5/11/2003
 4/28/2003 -   5/4/2003
 4/21/2003 -  4/27/2003
 4/14/2003 -  4/20/2003
  4/7/2003 -  4/13/2003
 3/31/2003 -   4/6/2003
 3/24/2003 -  3/30/2003
 3/17/2003 -  3/23/2003
 3/10/2003 -  3/16/2003
  3/3/2003 -   3/9/2003
 2/24/2003 -   3/2/2003
 2/17/2003 -  2/23/2003
 2/10/2003 -  2/16/2003
  2/3/2003 -   2/9/2003
 1/27/2003 -   2/2/2003
 1/20/2003 -  1/26/2003
 1/13/2003 -  1/19/2003
  1/6/2003 -  1/12/2003
12/30/2002 -   1/5/2003
12/23/2002 - 12/29/2002
12/16/2002 - 12/22/2002
 12/9/2002 - 12/15/2002
 12/2/2002 -  12/8/2002
11/25/2002 -  12/1/2002
11/18/2002 - 11/24/2002
11/11/2002 - 11/17/2002
 11/4/2002 - 11/10/2002
10/28/2002 -  11/3/2002
10/21/2002 - 10/27/2002
10/14/2002 - 10/20/2002
 10/7/2002 - 10/13/2002
 9/30/2002 -  10/6/2002
 9/23/2002 -  9/29/2002
 9/16/2002 -  9/22/2002
  9/9/2002 -  9/15/2002
  9/2/2002 -   9/8/2002
 8/26/2002 -   9/1/2002
 8/19/2002 -  8/25/2002
 8/12/2002 -  8/18/2002
  8/5/2002 -  8/11/2002
 7/29/2002 -   8/4/2002
 7/22/2002 -  7/28/2002
 7/15/2002 -  7/21/2002
  7/8/2002 -  7/14/2002
  7/1/2002 -   7/7/2002
 6/24/2002 -  6/30/2002
 6/17/2002 -  6/23/2002
 6/10/2002 -  6/16/2002
  6/3/2002 -   6/9/2002
 5/27/2002 -   6/2/2002
 5/20/2002 -  5/26/2002
 5/13/2002 -  5/19/2002
  5/6/2002 -  5/12/2002
 4/29/2002 -   5/5/2002
 4/22/2002 -  4/28/2002
 4/15/2002 -  4/21/2002
  4/8/2002 -  4/14/2002
  4/1/2002 -   4/7/2002
 3/25/2002 -  3/31/2002
 3/18/2002 -  3/24/2002
 3/11/2002 -  3/17/2002
  3/4/2002 -  3/10/2002
 2/25/2002 -   3/3/2002
 2/18/2002 -  2/24/2002
 2/11/2002 -  2/17/2002
  2/4/2002 -  2/10/2002
 1/28/2002 -   2/3/2002
 1/21/2002 -  1/27/2002
 1/14/2002 -  1/20/2002
  1/7/2002 -  1/13/2002
12/31/2001 -   1/6/2002
12/24/2001 - 12/30/2001
12/17/2001 - 12/23/2001
Saturday, August 26, 2006
19:07 - When marketing goes bad

(top)
Okay, what the hell is up with those Verizon ads for some phone with an iPod-like button interface?

Is it called the "Lady Sovereign", or the "Lady from Video Store", or the "Chocolate"?

Why would none of these surprise me?


18:10 - I'm a bum

(top)
Well, it's official: I'm unemployed now.

It's an odd feeling, and I'm pretty sure I don't like it. Even if it's only for the weekend.

Ah well. Come Monday I'll have plenty more odd things to get used to. I may as well try to enjoy it.


14:10 - "It's pretty awesome when it works"
http://www.kojinshugi.com/?p=424

(top)
Sam Muldia has a post in response to naysayers who would claim that this video of Stevenote demo failures is proof not only that Apple's claim to making stuff that "just works" is a fallacy, but that Doing It Yourself—with components bought off the shelf and good old predictable, reliable Windows—is the way to go.

It's a good post, though I know a few who will say that anecdotal reasoning is about worth the paper it's not printed on. I've had a similar path through DIY PCs and the eventual move to Macs as Sam has, however, so it certainly rings true for me. There are inconveniences to setting up a new PC that I've simply never thought about in the last six or seven years: downloading drivers, for example. Seriously: it's been years since I downloaded a driver. The few devices I've bought that require drivers come with them on CDs, and they always somehow—magically—manage to be compatible with the version of OS X I'm using.

My other reaction has to do with the blooper reel. I'm sure everyone's seen it; it's very amusing. But what exactly does any series of bloopers in product demos prove, whether it's from Microsoft or Apple? We might grin and exchange knowing glances when Windows XP goes to a BSOD when Bill Gates plugs in a scanner, or we might cringe and block our ears from the hecklers when a new online-service website doesn't work or iPhoto crashes. But the point of the "It just works" mantra is not about giant-screen demos. Really—it's not.

As Sam points out, the difference between the Mac and Windows experience is demonstrated when you take the thing out of the box, not when you see a demo of upcoming technology on stage. The chances that you'll run afoul of the same BSOD-inducing scanner driver or bad CGI on the .Mac site are pretty damned slim, because those particular bugs will likely have been stamped out by the evening after the demo—a furious post-keynote e-mail from the CEO will usually have that effect. But the real litmus test is in the overall experience the user actually has, during the out-of-the-box setup and over the course of the subsequent years of ownership.

Jobs not being able to explain what Adaptive Latent Semantic Analysis is doesn't say a damn thing about whether it "just works".

Besides, the most embarrassing and high-profile bloopers in this video are of things breaking that have nothing to do with Apple: a digital camera that won't turn on, a Sony executive who can't speak in front of crowds, an extensively tweaked Quake demo that fails to load. Probably what makes Jobs so furious about things like this is his feeling that he upheld his end of the bargain and made OS X demo-ready—but these third parties are letting him down.

When Mac users say their computers "just work", they're not going to point to Stevenote demos as evidence. They're going to point to their own experience in the real world. Blooper reels like this one might be cathartic for a few people who want to convince themselves that their Mac-using friends are crazy, but at the end of the day we know that even if a demo in some distant city didn't "just work", the computers on our desks sure do.

Wednesday, August 23, 2006
00:36 - Because that will work

(top)
I just saw an ad for "Aquapod", which is a pudgy bottle of "natural spring water—a blast of fun!"

It's bottled water, aimed at kids.

You can tell becaue it has "Pod" in the name.

How much did Nestlé spend on this website?


23:36 - Is Windows inherently more vulnerable to malware attacks than OS X?
http://weblog.infoworld.com/enterprisemac/archives/2006/08/is_windows_inhe.html

(top)
That's the question Tom Yager of InfoWorld is asking—and answering—here. He makes a pretty strong case.

I'm still reading it. It's juicy stuff.

Via Chris.


13:58 - Succeeding in spite of brilliance
http://viewfromthemountain.typepad.com/applepeels/

(top)
James Andrewartha points me at this interesting blog written by a disaffected ex-Apple insider. He introduces it thus:

To steal the blurb I wrote for http://grahame.angrygoats.net/Lore.pdf#page=10:

"It's written by the former Director of Federal Sales for Apple, this blog
exposes the inner workings of Apple. He documents how he succeeded in
increasing his sales 60% one year despite Steve Jobs not believing in
salespeople or the enterprise market. To reach the top level of
management, one must subscribe to the cult of Jobs, which allows one to do
no wrong, even to the point of one cult-member VP recommending Dell's
laptops over Apple's in a conference call. In fact, a lot of the
innovation in Apple is produced in spite of the cult which tries to clamp
down on anything Jobs didn't think of first or doesn't like."

Anyway, the latest entry covers how rank and file Apple employees are
often as in the dark as its customers, if not more so, which as you might
guess is not great for serving the customer.

Anyway, it's well worth reading back a few entries to see while Jobs might
be the best thing that's happened to Apple, in some respects he's also
been the worst thing and is actively harming the company by his actions.

I daresay. Still, though, and while I'm not exactly one of those Apple-can-do-no-wrong types, I would have to say that even if Jobs is as much an obstacle to Apple's success as a cause of it, I still tend to think that from the perspective of the casual Mac nerd, that's just fine.

We don't love Apple because it's perfect. Indeed, we acknowledge its many faults, which sometimes perversely endear it to us. I don't think anybody thinks Steve Jobs is the world's greatest CEO. That should, in fact, be self-evident, because business is a world of copycat behavior and following well-established practices, and the fact that you see so few companies run by Steve Jobses ought to be ample demonstration that his style isn't some universally accepted standard. Otherwise everyone would be writing how-to-succeed books that tell you to wear turtlenecks and jeans and be vegan and throw alliance-rending tantrums over hours-in-advance inadvertent product leaks.

Most of the wildly successful companies out there have bosses who fit a certain mold: they rose through the ranks of marketing or sales (seldom development), and they were acquired in exchange from some other company where they'd established a reputation as being a CEO who has the expertise to pilot a company of a certain size, or bring a company from a certain size to another certain size (usually, hopefully, a larger one), and then are jettisoned by the board when the company no longer fits the executive's particular field of strength. The CEO-as-rock-star days of the mid-90s are gone, and notably the companies that survived the dot-com crash are the ones that ran using established principles of business and a level-headed, stay-the-course strategy that relied on solid business plans and not nebulous buzzwords and hype. Those kinds of companies continue to return solidly on their investments and chug along contentedly, helmed by empty suits that are as at home on the golf course as in the boardroom, playing the schmooze game and establishing those all-important personal contacts that are key to the flow of qualified personnel that makes tech companies thrive.

But those aren't the companies that garner throngs of cheering fans.

Apple could well be a much bigger company, if it were headed by someone other than Steve Jobs. It could well even be a more innovative company, ruling the world with benevolence and ubiquity. But oddly, I don't think anyone would cheer for it then. It'd just be another AT&T or Adobe or Samsung.

Apple fans like Apple because of what it represents: a maverick that goes in the face of convention, using tools that are so slick in principle that they make the ubiquitous tools everyone else uses seem dull and clumsy by comparison, at least if you don't use the latter ones every day. What's more, Steve Jobs represents a benevolent dictator, a concept that many people hold a secret longing for—everyone who's read Tolkien, for example, has felt the thrill of seeing a rightful, pure-blooded king ascend the throne, much though that might fly in the face of all we believe about democracy and racial equality. Why do we feel that affinity for the fantasy of a realm led by a wise and noble ruler? Do we all secretly want to be ruled as long as the ruling is just? I'm sure I don't know. But Apple is sort of like a fantasy novel sitting on a shelf full of business manuals. It doesn't follow any of the rules the other guys do, and because of that it's able to do things the other guys would never have dreamed possible. Granted, it has plenty of flaws and is inherently unrealistic. But Apple fans would be fans of Apple whether they're riding high in the headlines, as they are today, or whether they're wallowing in the doldrums, as they were in the mid-90s. Fantasy doesn't have to make sense.

It's more or less a happy chance for us all that Apple has managed to parlay itself into a successful brand again, with gleaming stores in the malls and white earbuds dangling from every bobbing head in the gym. We get to feel that secret thrill that Hey, we were right all along. But deep down we know how fleeting it is; the iPod could be unseated tomorrow, or OS X could be laid low by some nasty virus, or the Apple Stores could all suddenly start being money-sinks and the company might have to start shutting them down. But that won't change any Apple geek's feelings for the company or its products, even if the alternatives are demonstrably better. We've spent years forgiving Apple for ripping off its own third-party developers to bring out products like Sherlock and Dashboard—something we'd never stop lambasting, say, Microsoft for. What can we say? Love is irrational.

But Jobs is the key. Apple in the 90s went through a series of CEOs who gradually, one by one, let Apple steer more and more into the mainstream of business behavior, bringing out products like digital cameras and CD players and rebranded printers and video game consoles (remember the Pippin?), and a range of Macs with unmemorable names like "Performa 6118CD". It got awfully hard to love Apple in those days, and the people who did were those who remembered what it once was, not so much those who loved what it had become. Jobs' return, though, ensured that even if the company was destined to go down in flames, at least it would do so with products called "iMac" and "iPod" and "TiBook" and "Panther". At least it would do so armed with gear whose very visual design made people drool and took us all by surprise every time the cover was whisked from it on stage. The boxes could be empty for all we cared—Photoshop tests were nice, but we could tell they weren't exactly being honest. We couldn't lie to ourselves and tell us our OS X boxes were actually faster than (or even as fast as) our friends' new gaming PCs. But we ignored all that, because the story was being told once again.

Today we've got a line of computers that all have "Mac" in the name and Intel CPUs inside. We love the speed, yes. We don't care that we've switched to the hated enemy under the hood, no. What matters to us isn't that Apple is kicking ass in the marketplace, but that it is establishing a legacy—one that will allow Steve Jobs to remain at the helm for the foreseeable future, making his pronouncements of occasional brilliance and routine astonishing thickness, enforcing his rule of law and his cult of personality and demanding that Apple sell nothing that wasn't personally magicked from thin air on stage by the wizard-king himself.

In the end, that's what Mac fans tend to like about the company. The practical-minded ones use OS X because of its demonstrated utility and versatility; you can hardly argue with a UNIX laptop that can also run iTunes in Aqua or XP, and that sports a hip logo to boot. But the people who spend all their time writing Web pages about Apple and committing their every move to historical record in a way that nobody would dream of doing for Microsoft or Dell—those are the guys who harbor a secret enjoyment of seeing an impossible fantasy coming true right before our eyes, a company that breaks all the rules in order to give us a story and a spectacle.

There's good and evil in the world, even in the halls of business. Or so we would like to lead ourselves to believe. Geeks get their inspiration from all kinds of places, be it a cherished comic-book superhero or a starship full of UN diplomats in space. But it's irresistible when we see that kind of fantasy play itself out at the end of a grassy, manicured street in sunny Cupertino.


11:25 - Who wants free Bryce 5?
http://www.daz3d.com/program/bryce/bryce5free.php

(top)
It's not very recent, and it won't even run on Tiger, but hey, it's free... and it might be of interest to someone out there.

Tuesday, August 22, 2006
19:31 - What comics are for
http://www.slate.com/id/2147309/

(top)
The 9/11 Commission Report has been made into a graphic novel, by Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colón.



They're releasing it a chapter at a time. I do believe I'll be coming back to this.

It's not quite The Spiders, but then again it's not exactly supposed to be.

Via Dean Esmay.


18:58 - I'm not done finding myself

(top)
I'd been having a heck of a time finding the music that had reportedly cost Cartoon Network a bundle for the opening montage in the season premiere of Venture Bros., "Powerless in the Face of Death", as reported in their bump that preceded it. Turns out this guy has done the hard work for me.

That intro is almost Zen-like in its construction: in a few quick takes it establishes the entire universe and all its players' positions within the storyline, and keys them all to the music in such a deft a way that it must have been true that it could not have been done properly with any other song.

And then they did it even better with the following week's intro to "Hate Floats".

Ten years from now we'll be looking back on these days the way we do now on the first few seasons of The Simpsons. I love it when we get to witness storytelling history in the making.

Monday, August 21, 2006
00:06 - Everybody loves the me!
http://www.homestarrunner.com/10years.html

(top)
Ten Years!
Previous Week...


© Brian Tiemann