g r o t t o 1 1

Peeve Farm
Breeding peeves for show, not just to keep as pets
Brian Tiemann
Silicon ValleyNew York-based purveyor of a confusing mixture of Apple punditry, political bile, and sports car rentals.

btman at grotto11 dot com

Read These Too:

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James Lileks
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As the Apple Turns
Entropicana
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Capitalist Lion
Red Letter Day
Eric S. Raymond
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Aziz Poonawalla
Corsair the Rational Pirate
.clue
Ravishing Light
Rosenblog
Cartago Delenda Est



Cars without compromise.





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12/17/2001 - 12/23/2001
Sunday, November 21, 2004
20:20 - Avert your eyes, children! It may take on other forms!

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Is it just me, or does this op-ed on Fox News' imminent Canadian debut have a distinct panicked sound? As though the author were saying, All this time everybody up here has dutifully believed us when we told them Fox was evil... but now, through some egregious security breach or other, there's a chance that they might actually watch it and have to decide for themselves whether it's as bad as we've always said! Don't worry, citizens—don't let your curiosity get the better of you! You're too sophisticated to need to think for yourselves! Trust our assertions!

I'm pretty ambivalent on Fox myself; I don't watch it any more than any other mainstream news station, which means "not at all". But this column sounds pretty well spooked to me. When someone tries this blatantly to hide something by simply warning people against giving it a fair hearing, it's pretty safe to say that they're afraid of what people might find out.

Via Paul Denton, who handily fisks it.

Saturday, November 20, 2004
21:23 - A little Presidential Rorschach test
http://powerlineblog.com/archives/008680.php

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John Kerry: "That son of a bitch knocked me over."

George W. Bush: "You son of a bitch, let him in or I'll knock you over."


20:17 - Cute fuzzy dewy-eyed fish
http://themoderatevoice.typepad.com/blog/2004/11/eat_fish_and_yo.html

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So does this indicate that PETA is getting more confident, or getting desperate?

Called the Fish Empathy Project, the campaign reflects a strategy shift by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals as it challenges a diet component widely viewed as nutritious and uncontroversial.

"No one would ever put a hook through a dog's or cat's mouth," said Bruce Friedrich, PETA's director of vegan outreach. "Once people start to understand that fish, although they come in different packaging, are just as intelligent, they'll stop eating them."

For all the "science" these people claim to embrace, the one inconvenient fact that we've evolved the enzymes and gastroflora indicative of a carnivorous ecological niche never seems to figure.


12:53 - Infiltration beyond the PC Curtain
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4028363.stm

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Apparently we're not just in the business of exporting things like Levi's and democracy these days. Now, at least in Britain, it's time for Apple Store Mania to begin.

Shop openings this side of the Atlantic traditionally consist of some feeble ribbon-cutting, a few pictures for the local newspaper, and maybe even a free goody bag for the first lucky customer to pass the threshold.

But in the world of Apple it was always going to be so much more.

Because judging by those queuing up for the opening of Europe's first Apple store in London on Saturday, their customers are not just buyers, they are believers.

They do not just prefer to use a Mac, they need the world to know how it has changed their life.

The whooping and hollering, high fives from the staff and frenzied countdown to lift-off were all signs of the brand worship that Apple has managed to engender in its followers.

Some had waited 25 hours or more in bitterly cold temperatures to be at the front of the queue. By 11 in the morning - one hour after opening - police were estimating 5,000 had turned up.

The traditions all sound the same... whether because they're engendered by the Apple staff or by insane Apple Store fans who travel the world waiting for every opening. From the look of video of the event, the Tokyo opening is going to hold the record for pure spectacle for a while; but now that Londoners have had a taste, they've got another shot in Birmingham coming up.

I have a friend in London who spent his first morning in line (er, queue) for an Apple Store opening. I'm eagerly awaiting his report.

(Via Steven Den Beste.)

Friday, November 19, 2004
16:29 - Aaauuugh!
http://www.vw.com/itscoming/

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So this is the new Jetta, is it?

Um... ew.

Hmm. I guess it's not that it's an ugly car, so much... it's that it just, well, doesn't look like a Jetta. At all.

The new GTI, which is now on the covers of the various car mags, struck me with how little it resembled the well-proportioned shapes of GTIs and Golfs of old—it's eggy and blobby. But it's a 2-door, and the 2-door Golfs have always been a bit more indistinct in their styling than the 4-door ones. I promised myself I'd reserve judgment.

But... this? Um... no.

One of the reasons why I ran out and bought a '99 Jetta the moment I saw photos of it (after quickly vetting it via the various reviews for obvious deal-killing flaws) was that it had a truly ingenious shape: a slinky and curvaceous outline, without a sharp edge on it, that somehow managed to look like a classic razor-planed 3-box shape had been caught in it, suspended as in a soap bubble. Look at the roofline: it's nearly a dome, with a smooth unbroken curve swooping from trunk to hood. Yet the shapes of the window outlines and door cutouts, with their purposeful utilitarian angles (that are themselves less severe than they look), superimposed on the rounded substrate, are like an 80s Jetta preserved in amber. The car looked futuristic in a purely natural and obvious way, retro without invoking that hackneyed word. I loved it from day one. I still love it.

What, then, of this new thing?

There's no "Jetta" left in it. The angular window elements are gone. The curvy roof is now no longer a stealthy, cheekily aerodynamic carapace over the 80s-style contours, it's now just as confused a surface as the characterless window cutouts. This thing is more Corolla than Jetta—lacking in any personality or tie to its heritage, it seems to have cast its chips on a new direction that severs its ties to the past. Because the Jetta/Golf/GTI is such a venerable bloodline that earned its reputation back in its earliest, scrappiest days, this could well be a fatal error for VW.

We are not pleased, precious, oh no.

Via InstaPundit, whose linking to this page renders laughable any supposed attempt by VW to keep it "hush-hush"...


14:43 - Do we detect a pattern?

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So the Washington Post has finally dropped Ted Rall's comic strip... and look at what Dean Esmay identifies as the final straw:

So. The Washington Post finally dropped Ted Rall. This time for a cartoon displaying America as a profoundly retarded, drooling freak.

To which I can only say: so repeatedly drawing cartoons comparing America to Nazi Germany, accusing the late Pat Tillman of being a bloodthirsty racist, 9/11 widows as being money-grubbing opportunists--this was not enough?

Why do I suspect that the only reason the Washington Post really acted finally was not because Rall is vile and hateful, but because he made fun of the mentally handicapped?

Somehow I'm not surprised that it's this strip, not this one or this one, that finally did it—let alone this piece of reasoned and nuanced geopolitical analysis. No... he finally stepped on something the WaPo actually considers precious this time, even if accidenally, in passing as it were—mere collateral damage. Too bad.

Is this kind of thing rare, though? Not hardly. Not to look at Kofi Annan's coming vote of no confidence—not over the mounting billions of Oil-For-Blood money stolen on his watch by UNSCAM, not over failing to prevent genocide in Rwanda or Darfur... but over a sexual harassment scandal.

Are people actually, perhaps, trying to bring odious people like these to justice, using the only tools they have available to them—technicalities to which their peers are actually susceptible? Is this the equivalent of nailing Al Capone on tax evasion charges? My optimistic core sort of hopes this is the case, because it means that while the forces of good are marginalized and forced to argue in meaningless and petty terms in order to bring real evil to justice, at least they're being heard, however indirectly. The alternative—that honestly nobody cares about people spreading vile propaganda or condoning genocide—is too depressing to contemplate.


11:30 - Maybe I'll start leaving my door unlocked

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Oh, the wondrous things we learn from movies! One was that America is a crime-ridden monstrosity of a nation, thanks in no small part to our guns and our lack of socialized medicine. It was in a really popular documentary, so it must be true.

Well, hmm...

Q. In your Ebert & Roeper review of Michael Wilson's "Michael Moore Hates America," you [Ebert] blurted out an erroneous opinion, expressing your doubts about the film's claim that the Canadian crime rate is double the U.S. rate.

I checked with www.statcan.ca, listed as "the official source for Canadian social and economic statistics and products," and with the U.S. Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics. The bottom line: These sites agree with Wilson's assertion that crime in Canada is much worse than in the USA.

James Elias, Highland Ranch, Colo.

A. Astonishing. For the year 2003, per 100,000 population, Canada had 8,530 crimes, and the U.S. 4,267. For crimes of violence, 958 vs. 523. For property crimes, 4,275 vs. 3,744. Michael Wilson, director of the film, tells me: "There was originally a comedic segment in the film that attributed this to the proliferation of Tim Horton's doughnut franchises, but I could not make it work."

Maybe Tim Horton's could start giving out free guns, like that bank in Flint?

I really gotta stop getting my juiciest news tidbits via Frank J.

Wednesday, November 17, 2004
19:58 - Ruining it for the rest of us
http://www.datelinehollywood.com/showarticle.php?articleID=340

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Thanks to Marcus; this is completely awesome.

STUDIOS SUE PIXAR, DEMAND BAD MOVIE

"Stop making the rest of us look bad," demand Hollywood executives

Hollywood — The eight major Hollywood studios have filed suit against CGI animation company Pixar for its consistent record of quality movies. The complaint alleges that with its sixth consecutive profitable and critically acclaimed film in “The Incredibles,” Pixar is overturning a decades-long public relations campaign waged by Hollywood studios to convince the public that it’s impossible to consistently make high quality films. “If Pixar doesn’t get with the program, we’re going to have to fundamentally change the way we do business,” groused Paramount chairwoman Sherry Lansing, whose studio hasn’t produced a hit film in several years. “I repeat my recommendation to Steve Jobs that he pay John Travolta and Halle Berry $20 million each to provide voices for an effects-laden remake of ‘The Fox and the Hound.’”

Marvelous. Pixar does seem to be leading a bit of a charmed life, doesn't it? What's the secret? Maybe the infamous Reality Distortion Field emanated by Jobs so influences all the creative minds in the company that they can fool even the rendering farms into creating awesome movies.

However:

he complaint asks that a court award the eight studios $1 billion in damages or compel Pixar to hire 118 unqualified development executives, option the rights to 38 scripts and books it has no intention of turning into films, and immediately greenlight sequels to “Toy Story” and “Finding Nemo” with $100 million-plus budgets and hire directors whose only experience is in music videos to oversee them.

In light of this (via Paul Denton), it's not all that funny, really...


16:37 - Retrospective

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One thing I've noticed from these last two or three years of being a news-hound is that there's simply so much data to process that the mental database rollups (as it were) occur way too frequently, purging items that happened way too recently, in favor of stuff that's even more recent.

And so, we've already forgotten some of the most gobsmacking moments of the months surrounding the tense few weeks of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Now we have people who are convinced that the whole Iraq war was for naught because the Iraqis "never wanted democracy anyway"; with Saddam's horrors slipping into memory already and spackled over with newer and flashier events like our election and Fallujah, we've forgotten the vindication that thrilled through the blogosphere a year and a half ago as we affirmed our commitment to that action, hard and gruelling though we knew it would be, and ultimately thankless at that.

It's time to remember a few things.

Remember Johann Hari's testimony of Iraqi exiles coming home. Remember Steven Den Beste's expansion on it.

Remember the "Human Shields" who went to Iraq, thinking they were doing the Iraqi people a service; and remember when they came home, shell-shocked, muttering "My God, what have we done?" after hearing to their dismay that the Iraqis wanted the invasion, and thought the "Human Shields" must have been on Saddam's payroll.

Remember Andrea vs. Mohammed, the infamous radio confrontation between a well-meaning peacenik and an Iraqi expat mocking her "simplistic Nickelodeon diplomacy".

Don't let these memes slip away into the bit-bucket of history. Lots of things have changed on the ground in Iraq since we went in last March; the moral muddle in which we find ourselves in the post-Abu-Ghraib, post-Saddam-capture, post-sovereignty-turnover, post-election, post-Fallujah world clouds our vision and makes doubters out of all of us. But we had better not let that render passé the fundamental rightness of what we undertook, or the necessity of seeing it through to the fruition to which we committed ourselves.


14:21 - Double-double with grilled onions and extra hippie

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Yesterday morning I was driving up to Ukiah to pick up my folks for a shuttle maneuver to an early flight this morning. I stopped in for lunch at the In-N-Out Burger in Mill Valley, the one with no drive-thru and no outdoor seating, so a single diner is always forced to share a table with some other lone traveler who couldn't shoulder his way to the counter where people sit with their drinks and wait for their burgers to appear.

Next to me, on my left, was a young couple—college-age, it seemed. The guy was directly to my left, so I didn't get a good look at him beyond the baseball cap and hooded sweatshirt; the girl, diagonally across from me, had that skinny, pinched, stringy, beaded-hair sort of look that always seems to accompany a steely look in the eye and a torrent of truly bewildering words, the kind that no amount of research can prepare you for.

I guess they must have been co-workers or something, because they clearly knew each other well enough to be eating at In-N-Out, but they didn't know each other well enough to have discussed each other's political viewpoints yet. I was witness to the unfurling of two opposed positions entrenching themselves in increasingly raised voices over a couple of burgers.

The immediate subject was the prisoner shooting incident in Fallujah. The guy said that he had some friends who were over in Iraq, and he knew them—they wouldn't just kill someone out of hand for no reason. He said a good many other things, things that led me to believe that he's been paying a good deal of attention to news sources other than what's on broadcast TV at six: he said that in his opinion the mainstream media is unhelpfully biased against the war and actively harming our efforts by covering every possible negative angle like paparazzi. He even said that in war, there are some occasions where censorship is necessary in order to win.

She didn't like this at all. There's nothing that should ever be censored, she said. The news media "are all controlled by... America," she haltingly growled, as though she wanted to say something else instead of that final word. (The guy tried to interject questions about Reuters and Agence France Presse, but was interrupted.) In her opinion, the war is fundamentally unjust because "you don't fight a war to liberate a country, so that's a pile of sh-- right there." (I guess give me liberty or give me death was just a suicide note.) And she then told the guy that she'd been listening to an interview—where, she didn't say—in which the interviewee told of Westerners who had gone to Iraq to help reconstruct, and who were told harrowing tales of oppression and horror at the hands of the Americans, tales which they pleaded with the Westerners to take back with them and tell us. In particular, she related a lurid story (one of many, she said, that never show up in the hopelessly biased pro-war press) that went as follows:

An Iraqi family was on their way home from dinner after dark. On the highway between the city where they'd eaten and where they lived, they saw a pair of headlights approaching. They pulled over to give the approaching vehicle room; but suddenly it swerved, stopped, blocked the road, and a bunch of American soldiers jumped out of what was clearly a Humvee. They then without warning emptied their guns into the family's car, killing the father, the mother, wounding one of the kids (who escaped and crawled off the road and out of sight), and then proceeded to steal the father's wallet, the mother's jewelry, and the young daughter's earrings right out of her ears.

The guy to my left made some conciliatory noise like "Yeah, well... there will always be horror stories." Which, of course, made the girl triumphantly ski away on a tangent about how this proves we don't hear enough bad stories about what goes on in Iraq, and how we're told an overly rosy story about our actions there. It was at that point that I finished my burger and got up to leave; actually I wasn't quite done, either, but I wanted to get out of there before I jumped in myself to the guy's defense.

Why in the hell would American soldiers murder and rob an Iraqi family? What possible motive could they have? Iraqis aren't rich people; it makes no sense whatsoever to say that the soldiers in question would have accosted a passing family on their way back from the Baghdad Applebee's with the hope of committing some random murder and stealing a child's earrings. I mean, am I totally off-base here? Or does something smell funny about this story? I can only assume it was originally related by the kid (or whoever it was) who escaped; could he possibly not be telling a perfectly accurate account? Or is it possible that there are two sides to this story?

We all remember what happened with that incident about a year ago when the soldiers in the Bradley stopped a pickup truck and searched its passengers at a nearby bridge, with the result that one of them fell in and died, leading to a huge scandal that got the whole unit pretty heavily punished, as I recall. (It didn't just get hushed up.) And of course there's always Abu Ghraib for people who hunger for good dirt against our military to suck on. (I don't recall the Zionist-controlled media covering that one up, somehow.) It seems to me that for someone to believe unquestioningly this one-sided story, with no corroboration or indeed logical consistency, reveals an insatiable desire to believe only the worst about us and the best about anyone opposed to us, and an endemic lack of critical thinking. It's the same lack of logic that says Katherine Harris rigged the 2000 election by changing just enough voter registrations to make the election too close to call, rather than by making it one-sided enough not to be suspicious; it's the same lack of logic that says Diebold would set up its electronic voting machines for a clear Bush win by, uh, making it possible for an army of cloak-and-dagger hackers to physically break into every one of them across the country (especially in Ohio) and seed them with enough Bush votes to put him just ahead; it's the same lack of logic that says Bush "lied" about WMDs in Iraq by following the same intelligence that everyone else had in the 90s, and yet forgot to plant some WMDs for our soldiers to "find" after the invasion so as to retroactively justify it instead of subjecting himself to a carton of facial egg. I guess that really shouldn't surprise me these days, and it doesn't, frankly—it's just hard to hear it coming from across an aisle two feet away and not to be able to confront it. And to have to listen to it apparently being successful in browbeating the poor guy into submission.

Of course if incidents like this are actually happening, they're horrible and reprehensible; if they're happening with any frequency at all, and betray anything widespread about the things that motivate our soldiers in general, then it would vastly change my beliefs about said soldiers and their honor and the standards to which they're held. But so far I have no reason to believe that such a story, even if it existed only in rumor form, would not have made it to the headlines of the evening news within hours; or that there's any reason to believe these stories at all without any corroborating evidence to belie the logic under the accusation.

None of the charges the Left levels these days seems to hold up to Occam's Razor. As I've said a number of times here and in e-mail, my credo is that if a theory depends on a perpetrator of some misdeed being both an evil genius and an incompetent fool, then it's not a plausible theory—especially if the facts can equally well be explained by perfectly innocuous means. You get to pick either "evil" or "incompetent"—not both. Picking both just means your brain's going to be spinning in the mud until next Election Day.

Tuesday, November 16, 2004
09:51 - Y'all're a bunch of enablers, is what you are
http://www.apple.com/server/macosx/tiger/

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We're thinking about consolidating all the various power-sucking rack-mounted computers in our garage, including our main house server, into a single machine running Mac OS X Server. This seems like a no-brainer, as I've got my old G4 sitting in there, currently serving as nothing more than a backup target disk, and Panther Server has all the infrastructure and tools for it to fulfill all the functions of a UNIX server, a Windows domain controller, and a Mac file server, all wrapped up in a slick-as-hell package with a Server Admin tool that makes things like DNS and Apache and Samba configuration ridiculously easy. Honestly, now that we've made this decision, I can't wait.

But there's a choice to make: either we get Panther Server now, or we wait until sometime next year (they claim 1H04, which probably means June 30) when Tiger Server comes out. There's no upgrade discount, so we'd have to buy it all over again... and it looks like a pretty hefty upgrade. More so than Tiger over Panther on the desktop, even.

• iChat Server. Host your own private and secure inside-the-firewall iChat server that uses your own namespace and works with both Tiger’s iChat AV and popular Jabber clients available on Windows, Linux and PDAs.

• Weblog Server. Host your own Weblog server, featuring calendar-based navigation and customizable themes. User can post using either a web browser or blog clients that support XML-RPC or the ATOM API.

• Software Update Server. Reduce network costs by controlling the distribution of Apple software updates with your own Apple software update proxy/cache server.

• Mobile Home Directories. Centrally manage mobile users’ home directories with Tiger Server. When they reconnect to the network, mobile home directories automatically synchronize to the server.

Heh! Apple's written a blog server. How 'bout that, huh? Included with every Mac OS X Server installation is a complete blog-hosting suite, with all the usual commenting/navigation features, including a client app for posting (presumably only from Macs, but we'll see). Apparently it's not something they just wrote from scratch (it's based on Blojsom), but they've Mac-ified it until it squeaks.

Which is what they've done with all these tools. I'm really looking forward to poking around at configuring all these UNIX tools that I've only seen through half-developed, poorly documented text-config-file interfaces. In fact, I'm looking forward to it enough that I think we'll go ahead and get Panther Server right now. I don't wanna wait.

Just being able to shut down all those redundant rack-mount servers will probably pay for it in a couple of months anyway...

Monday, November 15, 2004
18:29 - Museum-quality church
http://maroon.uchicago.edu/news/articles/2004/11/07/npr_star_keillor_tel.php

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So tell me... is there not something very much awry with the juxtaposition of this picture and this story?


Tears of laughter rolled down audience members’ cheeks as National Public Radio (NPR) superstar Garrison Keillor related humorous stories of childhood and provided insights on the election results at Rockefeller Memorial Chapel Wednesday at 8 p.m...

“I am a Democrat—it’s no secret. I am a museum-quality Democrat,” Keillor said. “Last night I spent my time crouched in a fetal position, rolling around and moaning in the dark.”

Not one to shy away from speaking his mind, Keillor proposed a solution to what he deemed a fundamental problem with U.S. elections. “I’m trying to organize support for a constitutional amendment to deny voting rights to born-again Christians,” Keillor smirked. “I feel if your citizenship is in Heaven—like a born again Christian’s is—you should give up your citizenship. Sorry, but this is my new cause. If born again Christians are allowed to vote in this country, then why not Canadians?”

I've got an idea: Try speaking in a mosque next, Garry, and calling for the disenfranchisement of Muslims. All in fairness, right?

This is one of the many vaguely creepy little things that keeps me from listening to NPR these days. It's like a postcard from Keilloria, where all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the Christians are unwelcome in their own places of worship.

As long as they demurely view themselves only as legitimate targets of ridicule, though, it's all good.


10:54 - The breaking point?

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It's been my sense for a while now that the unmistakably pessimistic tone struck toward the Iraq war by the mainstream news outlets (the evening news, websites, etc) owes as much to the fact that it's simply more sensational and ratings-friendly to show bad news coming out of Iraq than good news. The fact that for a more accurate, more hopeful view of the situation has to be obtained by people reading military blogs and first-hand accounts from men and women on the ground certainly has a lot to do with the slant we've seen documented in the media, but it's also simply because the news organs are only showing us what they think we want to see. Their market research tells them that their audience—the part that trusts them more—is the part that's naturally more amenable to their particular bias, and so they're just playing to the audience's expectations.

But if that's the case, what must it take for these news organs to start showing good news? Well, it would have to be some event that places good news into the "what the audience wants to hear" category. I think the media wants to start showing some more positive coverage; they're just kind of trapped by their ratings and market share numbers, and much like gas stations competing across an intersection, no individual player is going to be the first to intentionally sabotage its own market share by breaking from the lockstep. A gas station might lower its prices suddenly, and gain more customers than the guys across the street, but it might not be enough to offset the cost of the price drop. It's a gamble, and nobody wants to be the first to blink.

But I just heard on the radio that NBC is going to be showing a special called "Online in Iraq" (I didn't catch when exactly), billed as a look at the real story of what's going on there, through the eyes of the soldiers—and not filtered by the "mainstream media". (Yes, they actually used that term, and they leaned on it like they were saying "The Dark Lord" or something: Most people only know about what's going on in Iraq through the MAINSTREAM MEDIA. [ominous chords]) They played sound effects of modems connecting, and seemed to be suggesting that they'd be doing an exposé on military blogs and how different their view of the situation is from what's been relentlessly shown every evening by the talking heads.

Have we reached the breaking point, then? Has it come time for the news media to decide that it's in their interest after all to show an optimistic view of Iraq? If so, this is a really gutsy thing for NBC to do—it's deliberately pointing the finger of blame for dishonest reporting at the mainstream media (of which it, of course, is a part), and making a statement that the coverage of Iraq has been wrong all along. I can only imagine, if it's successful in pulling in the ratings, that the other networks will follow suit.

What's caused this sudden break, then? I wonder if maybe it's the Fallujah offensive. Suddenly we're engaged in a real, live shooting war again, one where the enemy is unmistakably evil—not even a tragic figure like Saddam's conscript army, against whom nobody really felt a great sense of honor in rooting. We knew those poor guys would get mowed down, and many of them didn't deserve it—Saddam had forced them to stand and die against their will—and our troops probably felt terrible pangs of guilt in driving through them. But now, in Fallujah—it's different. The bad guys are terrorists, pure and simple; they're the guys who have been kidnapping Westerners and other people who are in Iraq merely to help rebuild, then videotaping themselves beheading these poor hostages and broadcasting these gruesome images far and wide for all to see. It takes a Michael Moore not to see these people for the vermin they are, or to hold them up as some kind of honorable victims, much less as patriotic heroes fighting for Iraq's interests. Most Americans know better, and I think maybe the MSM is starting to feel it as well.

It's time for a little payback, and time for a little justified chest-pounding. Perhaps, too, the media—or at least NBC—realize that it's time to start showing an alternate side of the situation, one that will let us feel good about what we're doing in Iraq for a change.

Let's hope this is only the beginning.

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© Brian Tiemann