g r o t t o 1 1

Peeve Farm
Breeding peeves for show, not just to keep as pets
Brian Tiemann
Silicon ValleyNew York-based purveyor of a confusing mixture of Apple punditry, political bile, and sports car rentals.

btman at grotto11 dot com

Read These Too:

InstaPundit
Steven Den Beste
James Lileks
Little Green Footballs
As the Apple Turns
Entropicana
Cold Fury
Capitalist Lion
Red Letter Day
Eric S. Raymond
Tal G in Jerusalem
Aziz Poonawalla
Corsair the Rational Pirate
.clue
Ravishing Light
Rosenblog
Cartago Delenda Est



Cars without compromise.





Book Plugs:




Buy 'em and I get
money. I think.
BSD Mall




 4/14/2014 -  4/19/2014
  4/7/2014 -  4/13/2014
 3/31/2014 -   4/6/2014
 3/24/2014 -  3/30/2014
 3/17/2014 -  3/23/2014
 3/10/2014 -  3/16/2014
  3/3/2014 -   3/9/2014
 2/24/2014 -   3/2/2014
 2/17/2014 -  2/23/2014
 2/10/2014 -  2/16/2014
  2/3/2014 -   2/9/2014
 1/27/2014 -   2/2/2014
 1/20/2014 -  1/26/2014
 1/13/2014 -  1/19/2014
  1/6/2014 -  1/12/2014
12/30/2013 -   1/5/2014
12/23/2013 - 12/29/2013
12/16/2013 - 12/22/2013
 12/9/2013 - 12/15/2013
 12/2/2013 -  12/8/2013
11/25/2013 -  12/1/2013
11/18/2013 - 11/24/2013
11/11/2013 - 11/17/2013
 11/4/2013 - 11/10/2013
10/28/2013 -  11/3/2013
10/21/2013 - 10/27/2013
10/14/2013 - 10/20/2013
 10/7/2013 - 10/13/2013
 9/30/2013 -  10/6/2013
 9/23/2013 -  9/29/2013
 9/16/2013 -  9/22/2013
  9/9/2013 -  9/15/2013
  9/2/2013 -   9/8/2013
 8/26/2013 -   9/1/2013
 8/19/2013 -  8/25/2013
 8/12/2013 -  8/18/2013
  8/5/2013 -  8/11/2013
 7/29/2013 -   8/4/2013
 7/22/2013 -  7/28/2013
 7/15/2013 -  7/21/2013
  7/8/2013 -  7/14/2013
  7/1/2013 -   7/7/2013
 6/24/2013 -  6/30/2013
 6/17/2013 -  6/23/2013
 6/10/2013 -  6/16/2013
  6/3/2013 -   6/9/2013
 5/27/2013 -   6/2/2013
 5/20/2013 -  5/26/2013
 5/13/2013 -  5/19/2013
  5/6/2013 -  5/12/2013
 4/29/2013 -   5/5/2013
 4/22/2013 -  4/28/2013
 4/15/2013 -  4/21/2013
  4/8/2013 -  4/14/2013
  4/1/2013 -   4/7/2013
 3/25/2013 -  3/31/2013
 3/18/2013 -  3/24/2013
 3/11/2013 -  3/17/2013
  3/4/2013 -  3/10/2013
 2/25/2013 -   3/3/2013
 2/18/2013 -  2/24/2013
 2/11/2013 -  2/17/2013
  2/4/2013 -  2/10/2013
 1/28/2013 -   2/3/2013
 1/21/2013 -  1/27/2013
 1/14/2013 -  1/20/2013
  1/7/2013 -  1/13/2013
12/31/2012 -   1/6/2013
12/24/2012 - 12/30/2012
12/17/2012 - 12/23/2012
12/10/2012 - 12/16/2012
 12/3/2012 -  12/9/2012
11/26/2012 -  12/2/2012
11/19/2012 - 11/25/2012
11/12/2012 - 11/18/2012
 11/5/2012 - 11/11/2012
10/29/2012 -  11/4/2012
10/22/2012 - 10/28/2012
10/15/2012 - 10/21/2012
 10/8/2012 - 10/14/2012
 10/1/2012 -  10/7/2012
 9/24/2012 -  9/30/2012
 9/17/2012 -  9/23/2012
 9/10/2012 -  9/16/2012
  9/3/2012 -   9/9/2012
 8/27/2012 -   9/2/2012
 8/20/2012 -  8/26/2012
 8/13/2012 -  8/19/2012
  8/6/2012 -  8/12/2012
 7/30/2012 -   8/5/2012
 7/23/2012 -  7/29/2012
 7/16/2012 -  7/22/2012
  7/9/2012 -  7/15/2012
  7/2/2012 -   7/8/2012
 6/25/2012 -   7/1/2012
 6/18/2012 -  6/24/2012
 6/11/2012 -  6/17/2012
  6/4/2012 -  6/10/2012
 5/28/2012 -   6/3/2012
 5/21/2012 -  5/27/2012
 5/14/2012 -  5/20/2012
  5/7/2012 -  5/13/2012
 4/30/2012 -   5/6/2012
 4/23/2012 -  4/29/2012
 4/16/2012 -  4/22/2012
  4/9/2012 -  4/15/2012
  4/2/2012 -   4/8/2012
 3/26/2012 -   4/1/2012
 3/19/2012 -  3/25/2012
 3/12/2012 -  3/18/2012
  3/5/2012 -  3/11/2012
 2/27/2012 -   3/4/2012
 2/20/2012 -  2/26/2012
 2/13/2012 -  2/19/2012
  2/6/2012 -  2/12/2012
 1/30/2012 -   2/5/2012
 1/23/2012 -  1/29/2012
 1/16/2012 -  1/22/2012
  1/9/2012 -  1/15/2012
  1/2/2012 -   1/8/2012
12/26/2011 -   1/1/2011
12/19/2011 - 12/25/2011
12/12/2011 - 12/18/2011
 12/5/2011 - 12/11/2011
11/28/2011 -  12/4/2011
11/21/2011 - 11/27/2011
11/14/2011 - 11/20/2011
 11/7/2011 - 11/13/2011
10/31/2011 -  11/6/2011
10/24/2011 - 10/30/2011
10/17/2011 - 10/23/2011
10/10/2011 - 10/16/2011
 10/3/2011 -  10/9/2011
 9/26/2011 -  10/2/2011
 9/19/2011 -  9/25/2011
 9/12/2011 -  9/18/2011
  9/5/2011 -  9/11/2011
 8/29/2011 -   9/4/2011
 8/22/2011 -  8/28/2011
 8/15/2011 -  8/21/2011
  8/8/2011 -  8/14/2011
  8/1/2011 -   8/7/2011
 7/25/2011 -  7/31/2011
 7/18/2011 -  7/24/2011
 7/11/2011 -  7/17/2011
  7/4/2011 -  7/10/2011
 6/27/2011 -   7/3/2011
 6/20/2011 -  6/26/2011
 6/13/2011 -  6/19/2011
  6/6/2011 -  6/12/2011
 5/30/2011 -   6/5/2011
 5/23/2011 -  5/29/2011
 5/16/2011 -  5/22/2011
  5/9/2011 -  5/15/2011
  5/2/2011 -   5/8/2011
 4/25/2011 -   5/1/2011
 4/18/2011 -  4/24/2011
 4/11/2011 -  4/17/2011
  4/4/2011 -  4/10/2011
 3/28/2011 -   4/3/2011
 3/21/2011 -  3/27/2011
 3/14/2011 -  3/20/2011
  3/7/2011 -  3/13/2011
 2/28/2011 -   3/6/2011
 2/21/2011 -  2/27/2011
 2/14/2011 -  2/20/2011
  2/7/2011 -  2/13/2011
 1/31/2011 -   2/6/2011
 1/24/2011 -  1/30/2011
 1/17/2011 -  1/23/2011
 1/10/2011 -  1/16/2011
  1/3/2011 -   1/9/2011
12/27/2010 -   1/2/2010
12/20/2010 - 12/26/2010
12/13/2010 - 12/19/2010
 12/6/2010 - 12/12/2010
11/29/2010 -  12/5/2010
11/22/2010 - 11/28/2010
11/15/2010 - 11/21/2010
 11/8/2010 - 11/14/2010
 11/1/2010 -  11/7/2010
10/25/2010 - 10/31/2010
10/18/2010 - 10/24/2010
10/11/2010 - 10/17/2010
 10/4/2010 - 10/10/2010
 9/27/2010 -  10/3/2010
 9/20/2010 -  9/26/2010
 9/13/2010 -  9/19/2010
  9/6/2010 -  9/12/2010
 8/30/2010 -   9/5/2010
 8/23/2010 -  8/29/2010
 8/16/2010 -  8/22/2010
  8/9/2010 -  8/15/2010
  8/2/2010 -   8/8/2010
 7/26/2010 -   8/1/2010
 7/19/2010 -  7/25/2010
 7/12/2010 -  7/18/2010
  7/5/2010 -  7/11/2010
 6/28/2010 -   7/4/2010
 6/21/2010 -  6/27/2010
 6/14/2010 -  6/20/2010
  6/7/2010 -  6/13/2010
 5/31/2010 -   6/6/2010
 5/24/2010 -  5/30/2010
 5/17/2010 -  5/23/2010
 5/10/2010 -  5/16/2010
  5/3/2010 -   5/9/2010
 4/26/2010 -   5/2/2010
 4/19/2010 -  4/25/2010
 4/12/2010 -  4/18/2010
  4/5/2010 -  4/11/2010
 3/29/2010 -   4/4/2010
 3/22/2010 -  3/28/2010
 3/15/2010 -  3/21/2010
  3/8/2010 -  3/14/2010
  3/1/2010 -   3/7/2010
 2/22/2010 -  2/28/2010
 2/15/2010 -  2/21/2010
  2/8/2010 -  2/14/2010
  2/1/2010 -   2/7/2010
 1/25/2010 -  1/31/2010
 1/18/2010 -  1/24/2010
 1/11/2010 -  1/17/2010
  1/4/2010 -  1/10/2010
12/28/2009 -   1/3/2009
12/21/2009 - 12/27/2009
12/14/2009 - 12/20/2009
 12/7/2009 - 12/13/2009
11/30/2009 -  12/6/2009
11/23/2009 - 11/29/2009
11/16/2009 - 11/22/2009
 11/9/2009 - 11/15/2009
 11/2/2009 -  11/8/2009
10/26/2009 -  11/1/2009
10/19/2009 - 10/25/2009
10/12/2009 - 10/18/2009
 10/5/2009 - 10/11/2009
 9/28/2009 -  10/4/2009
 9/21/2009 -  9/27/2009
 9/14/2009 -  9/20/2009
  9/7/2009 -  9/13/2009
 8/31/2009 -   9/6/2009
 8/24/2009 -  8/30/2009
 8/17/2009 -  8/23/2009
 8/10/2009 -  8/16/2009
  8/3/2009 -   8/9/2009
 7/27/2009 -   8/2/2009
 7/20/2009 -  7/26/2009
 7/13/2009 -  7/19/2009
  7/6/2009 -  7/12/2009
 6/29/2009 -   7/5/2009
 6/22/2009 -  6/28/2009
 6/15/2009 -  6/21/2009
  6/8/2009 -  6/14/2009
  6/1/2009 -   6/7/2009
 5/25/2009 -  5/31/2009
 5/18/2009 -  5/24/2009
 5/11/2009 -  5/17/2009
  5/4/2009 -  5/10/2009
 4/27/2009 -   5/3/2009
 4/20/2009 -  4/26/2009
 4/13/2009 -  4/19/2009
  4/6/2009 -  4/12/2009
 3/30/2009 -   4/5/2009
 3/23/2009 -  3/29/2009
 3/16/2009 -  3/22/2009
  3/9/2009 -  3/15/2009
  3/2/2009 -   3/8/2009
 2/23/2009 -   3/1/2009
 2/16/2009 -  2/22/2009
  2/9/2009 -  2/15/2009
  2/2/2009 -   2/8/2009
 1/26/2009 -   2/1/2009
 1/19/2009 -  1/25/2009
 1/12/2009 -  1/18/2009
  1/5/2009 -  1/11/2009
12/29/2008 -   1/4/2009
12/22/2008 - 12/28/2008
12/15/2008 - 12/21/2008
 12/8/2008 - 12/14/2008
 12/1/2008 -  12/7/2008
11/24/2008 - 11/30/2008
11/17/2008 - 11/23/2008
11/10/2008 - 11/16/2008
 11/3/2008 -  11/9/2008
10/27/2008 -  11/2/2008
10/20/2008 - 10/26/2008
10/13/2008 - 10/19/2008
 10/6/2008 - 10/12/2008
 9/29/2008 -  10/5/2008
 9/22/2008 -  9/28/2008
 9/15/2008 -  9/21/2008
  9/8/2008 -  9/14/2008
  9/1/2008 -   9/7/2008
 8/25/2008 -  8/31/2008
 8/18/2008 -  8/24/2008
 8/11/2008 -  8/17/2008
  8/4/2008 -  8/10/2008
 7/28/2008 -   8/3/2008
 7/21/2008 -  7/27/2008
 7/14/2008 -  7/20/2008
  7/7/2008 -  7/13/2008
 6/30/2008 -   7/6/2008
 6/23/2008 -  6/29/2008
 6/16/2008 -  6/22/2008
  6/9/2008 -  6/15/2008
  6/2/2008 -   6/8/2008
 5/26/2008 -   6/1/2008
 5/19/2008 -  5/25/2008
 5/12/2008 -  5/18/2008
  5/5/2008 -  5/11/2008
 4/28/2008 -   5/4/2008
 4/21/2008 -  4/27/2008
 4/14/2008 -  4/20/2008
  4/7/2008 -  4/13/2008
 3/31/2008 -   4/6/2008
 3/24/2008 -  3/30/2008
 3/17/2008 -  3/23/2008
 3/10/2008 -  3/16/2008
  3/3/2008 -   3/9/2008
 2/25/2008 -   3/2/2008
 2/18/2008 -  2/24/2008
 2/11/2008 -  2/17/2008
  2/4/2008 -  2/10/2008
 1/28/2008 -   2/3/2008
 1/21/2008 -  1/27/2008
 1/14/2008 -  1/20/2008
  1/7/2008 -  1/13/2008
12/31/2007 -   1/6/2008
12/24/2007 - 12/30/2007
12/17/2007 - 12/23/2007
12/10/2007 - 12/16/2007
 12/3/2007 -  12/9/2007
11/26/2007 -  12/2/2007
11/19/2007 - 11/25/2007
11/12/2007 - 11/18/2007
 11/5/2007 - 11/11/2007
10/29/2007 -  11/4/2007
10/22/2007 - 10/28/2007
10/15/2007 - 10/21/2007
 10/8/2007 - 10/14/2007
 10/1/2007 -  10/7/2007
 9/24/2007 -  9/30/2007
 9/17/2007 -  9/23/2007
 9/10/2007 -  9/16/2007
  9/3/2007 -   9/9/2007
 8/27/2007 -   9/2/2007
 8/20/2007 -  8/26/2007
 8/13/2007 -  8/19/2007
  8/6/2007 -  8/12/2007
 7/30/2007 -   8/5/2007
 7/23/2007 -  7/29/2007
 7/16/2007 -  7/22/2007
  7/9/2007 -  7/15/2007
  7/2/2007 -   7/8/2007
 6/25/2007 -   7/1/2007
 6/18/2007 -  6/24/2007
 6/11/2007 -  6/17/2007
  6/4/2007 -  6/10/2007
 5/28/2007 -   6/3/2007
 5/21/2007 -  5/27/2007
 5/14/2007 -  5/20/2007
  5/7/2007 -  5/13/2007
 4/30/2007 -   5/6/2007
 4/23/2007 -  4/29/2007
 4/16/2007 -  4/22/2007
  4/9/2007 -  4/15/2007
  4/2/2007 -   4/8/2007
 3/26/2007 -   4/1/2007
 3/19/2007 -  3/25/2007
 3/12/2007 -  3/18/2007
  3/5/2007 -  3/11/2007
 2/26/2007 -   3/4/2007
 2/19/2007 -  2/25/2007
 2/12/2007 -  2/18/2007
  2/5/2007 -  2/11/2007
 1/29/2007 -   2/4/2007
 1/22/2007 -  1/28/2007
 1/15/2007 -  1/21/2007
  1/8/2007 -  1/14/2007
  1/1/2007 -   1/7/2007
12/25/2006 - 12/31/2006
12/18/2006 - 12/24/2006
12/11/2006 - 12/17/2006
 12/4/2006 - 12/10/2006
11/27/2006 -  12/3/2006
11/20/2006 - 11/26/2006
11/13/2006 - 11/19/2006
 11/6/2006 - 11/12/2006
10/30/2006 -  11/5/2006
10/23/2006 - 10/29/2006
10/16/2006 - 10/22/2006
 10/9/2006 - 10/15/2006
 10/2/2006 -  10/8/2006
 9/25/2006 -  10/1/2006
 9/18/2006 -  9/24/2006
 9/11/2006 -  9/17/2006
  9/4/2006 -  9/10/2006
 8/28/2006 -   9/3/2006
 8/21/2006 -  8/27/2006
 8/14/2006 -  8/20/2006
  8/7/2006 -  8/13/2006
 7/31/2006 -   8/6/2006
 7/24/2006 -  7/30/2006
 7/17/2006 -  7/23/2006
 7/10/2006 -  7/16/2006
  7/3/2006 -   7/9/2006
 6/26/2006 -   7/2/2006
 6/19/2006 -  6/25/2006
 6/12/2006 -  6/18/2006
  6/5/2006 -  6/11/2006
 5/29/2006 -   6/4/2006
 5/22/2006 -  5/28/2006
 5/15/2006 -  5/21/2006
  5/8/2006 -  5/14/2006
  5/1/2006 -   5/7/2006
 4/24/2006 -  4/30/2006
 4/17/2006 -  4/23/2006
 4/10/2006 -  4/16/2006
  4/3/2006 -   4/9/2006
 3/27/2006 -   4/2/2006
 3/20/2006 -  3/26/2006
 3/13/2006 -  3/19/2006
  3/6/2006 -  3/12/2006
 2/27/2006 -   3/5/2006
 2/20/2006 -  2/26/2006
 2/13/2006 -  2/19/2006
  2/6/2006 -  2/12/2006
 1/30/2006 -   2/5/2006
 1/23/2006 -  1/29/2006
 1/16/2006 -  1/22/2006
  1/9/2006 -  1/15/2006
  1/2/2006 -   1/8/2006
12/26/2005 -   1/1/2005
12/19/2005 - 12/25/2005
12/12/2005 - 12/18/2005
 12/5/2005 - 12/11/2005
11/28/2005 -  12/4/2005
11/21/2005 - 11/27/2005
11/14/2005 - 11/20/2005
 11/7/2005 - 11/13/2005
10/31/2005 -  11/6/2005
10/24/2005 - 10/30/2005
10/17/2005 - 10/23/2005
10/10/2005 - 10/16/2005
 10/3/2005 -  10/9/2005
 9/26/2005 -  10/2/2005
 9/19/2005 -  9/25/2005
 9/12/2005 -  9/18/2005
  9/5/2005 -  9/11/2005
 8/29/2005 -   9/4/2005
 8/22/2005 -  8/28/2005
 8/15/2005 -  8/21/2005
  8/8/2005 -  8/14/2005
  8/1/2005 -   8/7/2005
 7/25/2005 -  7/31/2005
 7/18/2005 -  7/24/2005
 7/11/2005 -  7/17/2005
  7/4/2005 -  7/10/2005
 6/27/2005 -   7/3/2005
 6/20/2005 -  6/26/2005
 6/13/2005 -  6/19/2005
  6/6/2005 -  6/12/2005
 5/30/2005 -   6/5/2005
 5/23/2005 -  5/29/2005
 5/16/2005 -  5/22/2005
  5/9/2005 -  5/15/2005
  5/2/2005 -   5/8/2005
 4/25/2005 -   5/1/2005
 4/18/2005 -  4/24/2005
 4/11/2005 -  4/17/2005
  4/4/2005 -  4/10/2005
 3/28/2005 -   4/3/2005
 3/21/2005 -  3/27/2005
 3/14/2005 -  3/20/2005
  3/7/2005 -  3/13/2005
 2/28/2005 -   3/6/2005
 2/21/2005 -  2/27/2005
 2/14/2005 -  2/20/2005
  2/7/2005 -  2/13/2005
 1/31/2005 -   2/6/2005
 1/24/2005 -  1/30/2005
 1/17/2005 -  1/23/2005
 1/10/2005 -  1/16/2005
  1/3/2005 -   1/9/2005
12/27/2004 -   1/2/2004
12/20/2004 - 12/26/2004
12/13/2004 - 12/19/2004
 12/6/2004 - 12/12/2004
11/29/2004 -  12/5/2004
11/22/2004 - 11/28/2004
11/15/2004 - 11/21/2004
 11/8/2004 - 11/14/2004
 11/1/2004 -  11/7/2004
10/25/2004 - 10/31/2004
10/18/2004 - 10/24/2004
10/11/2004 - 10/17/2004
 10/4/2004 - 10/10/2004
 9/27/2004 -  10/3/2004
 9/20/2004 -  9/26/2004
 9/13/2004 -  9/19/2004
  9/6/2004 -  9/12/2004
 8/30/2004 -   9/5/2004
 8/23/2004 -  8/29/2004
 8/16/2004 -  8/22/2004
  8/9/2004 -  8/15/2004
  8/2/2004 -   8/8/2004
 7/26/2004 -   8/1/2004
 7/19/2004 -  7/25/2004
 7/12/2004 -  7/18/2004
  7/5/2004 -  7/11/2004
 6/28/2004 -   7/4/2004
 6/21/2004 -  6/27/2004
 6/14/2004 -  6/20/2004
  6/7/2004 -  6/13/2004
 5/31/2004 -   6/6/2004
 5/24/2004 -  5/30/2004
 5/17/2004 -  5/23/2004
 5/10/2004 -  5/16/2004
  5/3/2004 -   5/9/2004
 4/26/2004 -   5/2/2004
 4/19/2004 -  4/25/2004
 4/12/2004 -  4/18/2004
  4/5/2004 -  4/11/2004
 3/29/2004 -   4/4/2004
 3/22/2004 -  3/28/2004
 3/15/2004 -  3/21/2004
  3/8/2004 -  3/14/2004
  3/1/2004 -   3/7/2004
 2/23/2004 -  2/29/2004
 2/16/2004 -  2/22/2004
  2/9/2004 -  2/15/2004
  2/2/2004 -   2/8/2004
 1/26/2004 -   2/1/2004
 1/19/2004 -  1/25/2004
 1/12/2004 -  1/18/2004
  1/5/2004 -  1/11/2004
12/29/2003 -   1/4/2004
12/22/2003 - 12/28/2003
12/15/2003 - 12/21/2003
 12/8/2003 - 12/14/2003
 12/1/2003 -  12/7/2003
11/24/2003 - 11/30/2003
11/17/2003 - 11/23/2003
11/10/2003 - 11/16/2003
 11/3/2003 -  11/9/2003
10/27/2003 -  11/2/2003
10/20/2003 - 10/26/2003
10/13/2003 - 10/19/2003
 10/6/2003 - 10/12/2003
 9/29/2003 -  10/5/2003
 9/22/2003 -  9/28/2003
 9/15/2003 -  9/21/2003
  9/8/2003 -  9/14/2003
  9/1/2003 -   9/7/2003
 8/25/2003 -  8/31/2003
 8/18/2003 -  8/24/2003
 8/11/2003 -  8/17/2003
  8/4/2003 -  8/10/2003
 7/28/2003 -   8/3/2003
 7/21/2003 -  7/27/2003
 7/14/2003 -  7/20/2003
  7/7/2003 -  7/13/2003
 6/30/2003 -   7/6/2003
 6/23/2003 -  6/29/2003
 6/16/2003 -  6/22/2003
  6/9/2003 -  6/15/2003
  6/2/2003 -   6/8/2003
 5/26/2003 -   6/1/2003
 5/19/2003 -  5/25/2003
 5/12/2003 -  5/18/2003
  5/5/2003 -  5/11/2003
 4/28/2003 -   5/4/2003
 4/21/2003 -  4/27/2003
 4/14/2003 -  4/20/2003
  4/7/2003 -  4/13/2003
 3/31/2003 -   4/6/2003
 3/24/2003 -  3/30/2003
 3/17/2003 -  3/23/2003
 3/10/2003 -  3/16/2003
  3/3/2003 -   3/9/2003
 2/24/2003 -   3/2/2003
 2/17/2003 -  2/23/2003
 2/10/2003 -  2/16/2003
  2/3/2003 -   2/9/2003
 1/27/2003 -   2/2/2003
 1/20/2003 -  1/26/2003
 1/13/2003 -  1/19/2003
  1/6/2003 -  1/12/2003
12/30/2002 -   1/5/2003
12/23/2002 - 12/29/2002
12/16/2002 - 12/22/2002
 12/9/2002 - 12/15/2002
 12/2/2002 -  12/8/2002
11/25/2002 -  12/1/2002
11/18/2002 - 11/24/2002
11/11/2002 - 11/17/2002
 11/4/2002 - 11/10/2002
10/28/2002 -  11/3/2002
10/21/2002 - 10/27/2002
10/14/2002 - 10/20/2002
 10/7/2002 - 10/13/2002
 9/30/2002 -  10/6/2002
 9/23/2002 -  9/29/2002
 9/16/2002 -  9/22/2002
  9/9/2002 -  9/15/2002
  9/2/2002 -   9/8/2002
 8/26/2002 -   9/1/2002
 8/19/2002 -  8/25/2002
 8/12/2002 -  8/18/2002
  8/5/2002 -  8/11/2002
 7/29/2002 -   8/4/2002
 7/22/2002 -  7/28/2002
 7/15/2002 -  7/21/2002
  7/8/2002 -  7/14/2002
  7/1/2002 -   7/7/2002
 6/24/2002 -  6/30/2002
 6/17/2002 -  6/23/2002
 6/10/2002 -  6/16/2002
  6/3/2002 -   6/9/2002
 5/27/2002 -   6/2/2002
 5/20/2002 -  5/26/2002
 5/13/2002 -  5/19/2002
  5/6/2002 -  5/12/2002
 4/29/2002 -   5/5/2002
 4/22/2002 -  4/28/2002
 4/15/2002 -  4/21/2002
  4/8/2002 -  4/14/2002
  4/1/2002 -   4/7/2002
 3/25/2002 -  3/31/2002
 3/18/2002 -  3/24/2002
 3/11/2002 -  3/17/2002
  3/4/2002 -  3/10/2002
 2/25/2002 -   3/3/2002
 2/18/2002 -  2/24/2002
 2/11/2002 -  2/17/2002
  2/4/2002 -  2/10/2002
 1/28/2002 -   2/3/2002
 1/21/2002 -  1/27/2002
 1/14/2002 -  1/20/2002
  1/7/2002 -  1/13/2002
12/31/2001 -   1/6/2002
12/24/2001 - 12/30/2001
12/17/2001 - 12/23/2001
Monday, October 6, 2003
04:10 - Anybody need a large-format flatbed scanner?

(top)
Because my new G5 has PCI-X slots, which are not compatible with the standard PCI SCSI card that powers my Microtek ScanMaker 6400XL scanner, I'm forced to sell it so I can recoup the cost toward the next model up (which supports FireWire).

(Forced to sell the scanner. Not the G5.)

And since nobody on Ebay feels like bidding, it behooves me to seek out some form of advertising for buyers that's free and yet reaches an audience of like-minded people who might be interested in this sort of thing.

Like... oh, I don't know... a blog.



Here she is. This is a large-format ("tabloid") scanner, e.g. 17x12" (A3) scan bed. It's in like-new shape, it's never let me down, and I feel like a cad for parting with it at all. It comes with:
  • Adaptec AHA-2906 PCI SCSI card, including Win/Mac drivers and all original manuals
  • 12-foot SCSI cable, 25-pin to 25-pin, which connects to the SCSI card directly
  • 25-pin to 50-pin adapter for the scanner end of the cable
  • Power cord

The scanner cost $900 when it was new; I'd be very happy if I could get something in the range of $500 for it now, but I'll be glad to listen to reasonable offers.

(Here's the official product page.)

Anybody? Anybody? Bueller?

Sunday, October 5, 2003
03:02 - American Indians Arenít Like Palestinians
http://www.badeagle.com/html/arent_pales.html

(top)
So says David A. Yeagley, a Comanche Indian.

Via Emperor Misha I.


01:41 - Turf Wars

(top)
Pictures! Yay!

This weekend we made some major progress in the backyard. We went from fence-up-but-not-much-else to fence-and-planter-box-installed-and ready-to-start-the-deck. This involves lots of intermediate steps, but I have lots of pictures, so bear with me.

First of all, the "Before" pictures.



Nice, right? A little bleak, a little stark, a little empty-- a little small, for that matter. Right? The tree is kinda ugly; this is taken in Februrary, though, when I was still on the initial tour with the real estate agent. Boring old backyard. Nothing to write home about, or certainly to post about.

What you don't see, because I couldn't bear to take a picture of it from the kitchen door, was the view you get when you look straight east, straight at the wall.

For maximum horror, here it is from the upstairs bedroom window:



That's right: it's the one major reason why this house had been on the market for five months, and had had its asking price lowered twice to about 3/4 that of all the identical houses on the street. There's a friggin' power substation right behind the house.

The real estate agents were having a hell of a time getting people interested, apparently; seems it was the South-of-85 version of the Murder House that Marge sold to the Flanderses. Once, when I was standing in the cul-de-sac talking to the agent, another agent drove into the driveway and took a potential buyer inside. I heard them talking, clucking over the living room, looking at the staircase, going into the kitchen, looking outside-- and then TROMP TROMP TROMP they come running back outside, jump in the SUV, back out of the driveway, screech to a halt, and then peel out westward down the street, leaving smoking rubber patches where their tires were. And hey, it's not like I can blame them.

But we were stupid that way-- we thought, hey, we can MAKE something of this! And for what it's worth, the station doesn't make that much noise or anything, and we're sure there aren't any PCBs or anything in the soil or evil EM waves in the air. (We even get perfectly fine AirPort reception.) And the view, if you ignore the power station, on a clear day (which the above picture is not), actually looks out across the valley to the mountains on the opposite side-- it's a nice view, a valley view. It's not a view of, say, someone else's backyard.

How's that for spin?

Anyway: after a summer's worth of work both inside and out in the house, it's really become a totally different beast now. The interior colors are all different. My bedroom is now a luxurious master suite with crown moldings, new floor trim, a semi-private bath, and a divider wall with archways and red velvet curtains leading to the bed area. (Material for another post.) Art is hung on the walls. The front yard is landscaped with boulders and hibiscuses and a myrtle and a park bench. And the backyard is unrecognizable as its former self.

First order of business, after installing the hot tub (first things first), was the fence.



Neat, huh? It's made of redwood fence slats screwed into horizontal beams bolted to vertical treated 4x4 posts, which are each carriage-bolted into holes we painstakingly hammer-drilled through the concrete-brick fence. It totally blocks out most of the power station from ground level-- and what you can see through the latticework will be blocked out once we plant some morning glories which will climb up the vertical trellises and creep throughout the horizontal pieces.

But what shall we plant them in, my precioussss?

Why, this!




(Do be so good as to disregard the machinery littering the place. What I'm pointing at is what's along the base of the fence.)

It's a planter box, made of railroad ties. And those things are heavy! 9x7-inch by 8-foot pine beams, soaked in creosote, which fills your lungs and causes cancer when you try to cut it. But it's been wrestled into shape and pinned into position, and now all the fill soil we dug out of the front yard is piled into the box and ready to be covered with topsoil.

I should note that in the picture on the upper right, the big open expanse of dirt is where there used to be a mound of earth and turf carted in from the front, and caked into a volcanic lava cap by the summer heat. Today I moved it all, wheelbarrow by wheelbarrow, into the planter box. And even when armed with a pickax and a square-point shovel, it is hard to cut turf. It's got that nylon-string mesh stuff, and the big clods stick together and prevent you from getting your shovel into it. My left arm is hanging limply by my side as I type; fortunately I've trained my blisters to be prehensile, or else I'd never have been able to type this.

Anyway, that's where things stand. I may post a layout drawing of the backyard plan sometime soon; it's vital for the understanding of what's going on to be able to see the final blueprint. The deck, suffice it to say, will surround the hot tub and sit on top of the railroad ties where it juts back toward the house, and will merge flush with the edge of the planter box. The railroad ties will be painted (to reduce the creosote smell) and faced with redwood, to make it possible to sit on them. And then the box will be filled full of turf, ground-cover flowers, and nice spreading trees which will nod over the hot tub.

And then the right corner gets planted with birch groves and floored with bushes and lawn and inlaid with pavers for lawn furniture, and the left corner gets a gazebo, a flooring treatment involving lots of flat flagstones, and a round lawn. Add a few more trees as privacy screens, run 110-volt power and Ethernet and soupcan-string intercom, and voilŠ-- nothin' to it!

Honestly I have no idea what we've let ourselves in for. But it's been fun so far-- or at least, I'm assuming it's been fun, because most things that leave me this sore are fun.


00:51 - Thanks for the bullet points

(top)
There's an anti-recall ad on TV right now. It says:

Under a Democratic governor, we've:
  • Passed domestic partnership legislation
  • Banned greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming
  • Strengthened laws protecting a woman's right to choose
  • Enacted the nation's toughest gun safety laws
  • Worked to stop offshore drilling
  • Passed the 8-hour work day
  • Increased the minimum wage
  • Expanded family and medical leave

The Republicans fought against each of these issues. If they get rid of the governor, what do you think they'll do next?

Gee, I dunno, but I've got a few suggestions.
Saturday, October 4, 2003
02:59 - The case for a state-run news media

(top)
Phew. Sorry about the deliberately misleading title. I just did it to get your attention. Did it work?

But things that are deliberately misleading is kinda the subject of the day, isn't it?

I've gotten a lot of responses to my post from Thursday, in which I said:

Next year's election will be where the final hand is dealt. It will tell us how many people in this country have been able to weather the battering of the guiltmongers and the doom-seekers and the sowers of Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt, and hold on to what we know is the right course of action for ourselves and for the world-- and how many are ready to cash in, give up, lie down and let blissful slumber overtake our eyes while the Pods placed by the social-progressive Europeans creep ever closer to our bedsides.

One of the more cynical responses said, simply, "Democracy's a bitch... isn't it?"

All I could think of in response was, "Yup... after all, it gave us Hitler."

There's an ugly expression-- or, rather, an expression that's come to seem ugly through modern eyes: "Making the world safe for democracy." It's an idea that seems to have gone largely out of style, mostly because people don't really "get" what it means anymore. To many, it sounds like a veiled form of idealistic imperialism, a presumption on the part of buzz-cut white males in Congress that our quaint and abstract and tired concept of "democracy" is something that the rest of the world wants, and only doesn't have because of some vague and imagined threat floating on the horizon.

It's been a while since anybody had to think of this as being reality. It's been a while since it's been reality.

Or has it?

It's at the core of what we're doing in the Middle East, after all. We're removing obstacles which stand in the way of democracy, such as the Taliban and Saddam. Democracy is a powerful self-sustaining force, but it's more fragile than we often realize-- in order to take root, it needs time, dedication, and stability. And even a stable democracy can be overthrown... or overthrow itself.

We fought against encroaching communism because communism was an idea that could be voted in by a democratic public, even though once instated it would effectively destroy the democracy that created it. It's a seductive, compelling idea, one that-- given enough play in people's minds-- can come to power and then burn the bridges behind it that brought it there.

For Marx, after all, had something right: he believed that it was the natural progression of a capitalist society to eventually evolve into a communist one. So we've seen can indeed be the case, in a sense: the richer and safer and more peaceful a country becomes on the strength of its free-market economy, the more its people will push for socialistic reform, more state services paid for by higher taxes, and so on. Guilt on the part of the rich leads to elites pushing statism as a form of philanthropy for the proletariat. A democracy can voluntarily vote into power a communist system, because its people will be convinced that it's the best thing for them to do.

Trouble is, communism isn't a "new and improved" form of economics, one that breaks free of capitalism-imposed chains and carries its adherent nations to the stars. It's quite the opposite, as we've seen; it can take a vibrant, innovative, individualistic people and transform it into a homogeneous, dull, dreary, bleak mass of impoverished welfare-slaves without hope of respite (let alone aspiration to excellence), crushed under the weight of a bloated and often unbelievably brutal State. The people might have voted for it, but it's not the enlightened panacea they'd hoped it would be. And they'd go back to the way it was before... if only they could.

Our goal during the Cold War was to "make the world safe for democracy"-- meaning that we would prevent communism from taking hold in countries that might be seduced into voluntarily trying it. Our doing so meant the support of brutal military dictators in places like Iran and Panama and Chile, and we've paid a bitter price in honor and human life-- but wasn't it the lesser of two evils, in the long run? Maybe not, but can the question be dismissed out of hand?

So here we are, "making the world safe for democracy" again. This time, the threat we have to fight in order to make democracy safe is Islamism and old-fashioned Arab strongman dictatorship. Both things that a democratic Middle Eastern populace can vote into power. It's unlikely that Iraq would choose an Islamist government like the Taliban or like the Iranian mullahs, but the possibility is there-- it could happen.

All it takes is for the free populace of a democracy to be fed misleading information, pervasively and from the sources that they implicitly trust. Whether these sources are the government, religious leaders, or a free press, all that matters is that the people believe it.

Gary Larson reminds us:

This phenomenon validates Joseph Goebbels' 1934 advice: Bombard the "primitive rank and file," with "propaganda...essentially simple and repetitive." To say this Nazi tactic works today is an understatement.

And, needless to reiterate, Hitler came to power democratically.

So: what is it that keeps our democracy strong and self-sustaining?

A free media, many cry.

Yeah, well, here's a question: What happens when a free media undergoes a trend wherein it decides as a bloc to accomplish some partisan end, even if it means perpetuating lies and deliberately misleading the public? What checks and balances exist in a free media to make sure it keeps telling the truth, so the populace is accurately informed?

Well, there are news organs of every political persuasion, comes the answer. If one is lying, another will balance it out and debunk it.

A fine theory. One that's served us well for many, many years. One that certainly seems always to have held true.

But what if it's not?

What if all the major news organs decide that their job is no longer To Tell The Truth, but To Get Ratings? What if journalists, ever seeking the scoop of a lifetime and the status of a Bob Woodward, commit to actively defrauding the public so as to advance their own careers within the media industry that's itself locked into a marketing/sales feedback loop of dispensing anti-Administration memes, being told by ratings that the people--fascinated and shocked--want to see more, and then having to produce more and more of the same slanted "reporting" because it's what the audience wants?

Americans have an insatiable lust for The Truth; it's part of our DNA. We also have a latent mistrust for authority, and we're always willing to entertain the notion that our government might be lying to us.

So we give the benefit of the doubt-- reflexively-- to whoever blows the whistle on them. It's a lot harder for us to believe that Jimmy Olsen is misleading us than that the government is, and we love a good stick-it-to-the-Man scandal. It's the media who always looks like the good guys... even when they're the weasels.

I'm not saying that this is what's actually happening. The media companies appear to be left-biased, but their relentlessly downbeat reporting about Iraq and Bush might stem simply from the "good news doesn't sell" adage, and a palpable sense of cynicism about blatant patriotism in the news-- even if all that can be interpreted as such is the ungarnished coverage of a positive development in the war. But it can hardly be denied that the media seems more willing to linger over the kinds of headlines that Michael Moore or Robert Fisk might pen, than over a dispassionate White House press release. It's hard to pin down the likes of CNN and MSNBC and the New York Times as deliberately lying as a matter of course. But their slant feeds free organzations like MoveOn.org, who do their grass-roots activism based on a fraudulently constructed impression of reality, as when they gleefully parrot New York Times Dowdifications like the "Ahnuld is a Nazi" meme even as it gets soundly debunked by the people who are paying attention.

So what happens if our free media, the institution that we so rightly place on a pedestal as one of our greatest achievements and the most obvious declaration of our unashamed belief in the strength of our democracy, lies to its patrons like Goebbels did?

We've grown to trust our free media precisely because it's free. Its freedom inherently guarantees accuracy and balance, we tell ourselves.

And that's where a lying free media is even more insidious than a Pravda. Because if we had a Pravda in this country, at least we would know it was lying. We don't expect lies from CNN.

I will reiterate, just for clarity: a state-run media would be a disaster for this country, a baldfaced denial of everything we stand for. I hate the idea. It's despicable. I would never condone such a thing, or deign to live in an America that had instituted it.

But... (and don't we all love that word now?)...

If our free society and its free press have embarked upon a feedback loop of anti-Bush rhetoric that has taken upon itself such a life of its own that we no longer care whether the things we accuse him of are even true, as long as they get him out of office... that is precisely what would signal, to me, the demise of the America that we know. It would mean that freedom had failed us. It would mean that in our freedom and our trust in those whom we trusted because of our freedom, we had wilfully deluded ourselves from reality in favor of a sickly-sweet poultice for our souls. It would mean that we had sacrificed Truth at the altar of pleasing fantasies. It would mean that we'd come to value other countries' present opinions over the lessons of our own history.

This has never been true of us in the past-- and the day it becomes true is the day that America ceases to be America.

Friday, October 3, 2003
03:22 - Meanwhile, on planet Earth
http://www.clevelandjewishnews.com/articles/2003/09/18/news/local/dadeli0919.txt

(top)
"Controversial Cleveland murals are protected".



Yeah, I'll "protect" them all right. Please go stand by the stairs.

Ayad, 37, a Palestinian-American who owns Grandpa's Kitchen, has had dozens of controversial images painted on his business establishment over the last few years. Public officials and Jewish Clevelanders say these murals are blatantly offensive and antisemitic.

The newest signs, painted over the spring and summer at the deli, include a group of skullcap-wearing Jews counting money at a table while Jesus hangs on a cross above them, and a supposed talmudic endorsement of pedophilia. In the latter, a Jewish priest holds a small boy in his arms. The priest is quoted as saying, "Silly man, this is not my son, he's my wife." Below this is an alleged line from the Talmud. "Like the tear comes to the eye again and again so does ... virginity to a child under 3 years and 1 day."

Above this mural is contact information for Cong. Stephanie Tubbs Jones for those seeking reparations from Israel. The congresswoman's image has also unflatteringly appeared on past murals. Ayad was angry she never followed up on a letter she sent him over two years ago, claiming she would help him get back his father's land.

Another new sign shows Hitler with the Star of David branded into his upraised and bleeding hand. A larger Star of David superimposed with a swastika is painted to the right of this image.

Remember, always remember: It's Muslims who are constantly oppressed and silenced and publicly vilified in this racist country of ours.

I mean, criminy.

Via LGF.


03:04 - Not off the hook
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A40241-2003Oct3.html

(top)
So Verisign's being made to take out their * records.

VeriSign Inc., the firm that operates a key piece of the Internet's address system, said it would temporarily shut down a new service that makes money off the typos of Web users after the Internet's oversight body threatened to take legal action against the company.

Earlier today, Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) President Paul Twomey sent a letter to VeriSign demanding that the company take the service down or face legal consequences. Under its contracts with VeriSign ICANN can impose up to $100,000 in fines or strip the company of its authority to operate the registries that handle dot-com and dot-net Internet addresses.

Damn straight.

But look at VeriSign's 'tude:

"Without so much as a hearing, ICANN today formally asked us to shut down the Site Finder service," said VeriSign spokesman Tom Galvin. "We will accede to their request while we explore all of our options."

. . .

VeriSign also angered the close-knit group of engineers and scientists who are familiar with the technology underpinning the Internet. They say that Site Finder undermines the worldwide Domain Name System, causing e-mail systems, spam-blocking technology and other applications to malfunction.

VeriSign said the claims are overblown.

"There is no data to indicate the core operation of the domain name system or the stability of the Internet has been adversely affected," VeriSign's Galvin said. "ICANN is using anecdotal and isolated issues in an attempt to assert a dubious right to regulate non-registry services."

It would have been one thing if VeriSign had owned up to their error, said "We understand that this move on our part has caused legitimate concern to many Internet technical professionals, and we apologize for our presumption." It would even have been hardly objectionable-- just par for the course-- if they'd taken the tack of "Well, we're sorry we got caught. But it won't happen again."

But this?

"War is breaking out between the regulators and the people they regulate. This is a real power struggle [over] who controls the rules on the Internet going forward," said said Paxfire's Lewyn.

"Oh! You freaky propellerheads don't know what you're talking about! This is all just politics! You're all ganging up on a poor defenseless company who's only trying to innovate!"

These comments tear it. I'd mistrusted VeriSign before, but now they've shown themselves to be totally uninterested in the proper operation of the system they're being trusted to administer-- only in gouging people.

The VeriSign, the.

19:11 - Color me surprised
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=586&e=4&u=/nm/20031003/wl_nm/iraq_po

(top)
Feh.

Polish troops in Iraq (news - web sites) have found four French-built advanced anti-aircraft missiles which were built this year, a Polish Defense Ministry spokesman told Reuters Friday.

France strongly denied having sold any such missiles to Iraq for nearly two decades, and said it was impossible that its newest missiles should turn up in Iraq.

"Polish troops discovered an ammunition depot on Sept. 29 near the region of Hilla and there were four French-made Roland-type missiles," Defense Ministry spokesman Eugeniusz Mleczak said.

"It is not the first time Polish troops found ammunition in Iraq but to our surprise these missiles were produced in 2003."

You know, I always wondered what Arabs thought of using missiles named after the French semi-mythological hero who fought back the Saracens at Roncesvaux.

Apparently it was just peachy-keen, with Saddam and with Chiraq.

Thursday, October 2, 2003
20:25 - Sarindar
http://frontpagemag.com/Articles/ReadArticle.asp?ID=10111

(top)
If this is true...

Iraq, in my view, had its own "Sarindar" plan in effect direct from Moscow. It certainly had one in the past. Nicolae Ceausescu told me so, and he heard it from Leonid Brezhnev. KGB chairman Yury Andropov, and later, Gen. Yevgeny Primakov, told me so, too. In the late 1970s, Gen. Primakov ran Saddam's weapons programs. After that, as you may recall, he was promoted to head of the Soviet foreign intelligence service in 1990, to Russia's minister of foreign affairs in 1996, and in 1998, to prime minister. What you may not know is that Primakov hates Israel and has always championed Arab radicalism. He was a personal friend of Saddam's and has repeatedly visited Baghdad after 1991, quietly helping Saddam play his game of hide-and-seek.

. . .

It was just a few days after this last "Disclosure," after a decade of intervening with the U.N. and the rest of the world on Iraq's behalf, that Gen. Primakov and his team of military experts landed in Baghdad ó even though, with 200,000 U.S. troops at the border, war was imminent, and Moscow could no longer save Saddam Hussein. Gen. Primakov was undoubtedly cleaning up the loose ends of the "Sarindar" plan and assuring Saddam that Moscow would rebuild his weapons of mass destruction after the storm subsided for a good price.

Mr. Putin likes to take shots at America and wants to reassert Russia in world affairs. Why would he not take advantage of this opportunity? As minister of foreign affairs and prime minister, Gen. Primakov has authored the "multipolarity" strategy of counterbalancing American leadership by elevating Russia to great-power status in Eurasia. Between Feb. 9-12, Mr. Putin visited Germany and France to propose a three-power tactical alignment against the United States to advocate further inspections rather than war. On Feb. 21, the Russian Duma appealed to the German and French parliaments to join them on March 4-7 in Baghdad, for "preventing U.S. military aggression against Iraq." Crowds of European leftists, steeped for generations in left-wing propaganda straight out of Moscow, continue to find the line appealing.

Mr. Putin's tactics have worked. The United States won a brilliant military victory, demolishing a dictatorship without destroying the country, but it has begun losing the peace. While American troops unveiled the mass graves of Saddam's victims, anti-American forces in Western Europe and elsewhere, spewed out vitriolic attacks, accusing Washington of greed for oil and not of really caring about weapons of mass destruction, or exaggerating their risks, as if weapons of mass destruction were really nothing very much to worry about after all.

... And we end up voting Bush out of office purely because of the palatability of the idea that he "lied" about WMD, then it's all over. The terrorists will have won.

Not just them, though. Al Qaeda's actually a side issue in the global game, looked at through this lens. What's really at stake is a century-long war of ideology, where on one side we have the ever-encroaching socialistic forces that prey on the compassion of people in rich and peaceful countries... and on the other, increasingly alone in holding out against those forces, is America. The Cold War had strongly delineated sides, big polar extremes to choose between. But since 1990, when we thought we'd won, it seems to me that all we've done is let our guard down.

The encroachment has continued. Only it's been at such a low level, and embarked upon with such pure and benign of intentions, that we never saw it coming.

It's called the "peace" movement, "green" politics, our old buddy transnational progressivism, and Western self-loathing and revulsion at seeing our own institutions-- the things we'd once looked on with pride and affection, like Levi's and McDonald's and Barbie-- being pulled into far-flung cultures. They all loved us, but we hated ourselves. We hated ourselves for poisoning the world with our gauche impurity. And we fought ourselves whenever we had the opportunity to make the world a better, richer, or more peaceful place.

We were busy for fifty years trying to hold back the Iron Curtain. But the forces trying to hold us back come from within our own borders.

Sure, that's no bad thing, if what you're talking about is "imperialism". (Read this if it's what you think I mean.) But it is a bad thing when the America that the hippies and their modern counterparts mean to restrain is the America that dares to try to do some good in the world, just because it's the right thing to do. "Who are we to say what's right or wrong?" they cry.

Well, it seems to me that we've done a better-than average job of making those judgments so far. Better than some countries I could mention.

But now we've seen exactly what happens when all the sides in this ideological battle, all the ones who have been building up their ranks in secret and in the open for decades, are called upon to show their hands. 9/11 did that-- it brought everyone out of the woodwork, Right and Left, and forced everyone to take sides. In the grand scheme, it looks as though that's the biggest effect 9/11 may in fact have had: it's the closing bell, the shout of pencils down! that tells us to take stock now of how many people stand on which side of the line.

Protests in the streets of cities around the world against the prospect of America freeing twenty-four million people from the grip of the worst tyrant since Hitler have shown one side's numbers, one side's strength. "Human shields". University professors remembering Mogadishu the way we used to remember the Ardennes. Hollywood, our proudest and most uniquely American institution, rallying in a bloc to impose restraint upon our bellicosity. And the news media determined to convert our proudest moment in the modern age, our greatest act of charity and humanity and sacrifice, and our most easily vindicated by anyone looking at it with clear eyes-- into a shameful failure. That is the measure of the opposition's strength.

They're stronger than I ever would have imagined possible.

It's not "protest" when you've gained the upper hand.

All the threads are coming together now. All the grass-roots forces and pressure groups and lobbies that with one hand held up the torch against the bleak bulwarks of the Warsaw Pact, and with the other sifted into our national bloodstream an intravenous drip of a watered-down, sugared-up, tantalizingly addictive stream of the same poison that had doused the far side of those walls-- they've all shown their colors now. All in the name of equality, diversity, peace, conservation, and respect, we've found ourselves not having won the Cold War after all-- but having set ourselves up to lose the Warm War. That's what it's been all along.

Who could be so callous as to take a stand against racial equanimity? Or so hateful as to oppose peace? Or so ghoulish as to fight against environmental controls?

Those questions are exactly the weapons that we were never equipped to defend against. Nor, judging by the snow-blanket silence coming from the White House lately, do we have the means to do so now.

Because it would appear that the forces that want us to pull back, quiet down, leave the world stage, and stop trying to solve other people's problems are in fact stronger than the forces that cling to those old-fashioned notions of justice, fairness, security, and freedom for all.

The only reason that the latter side has been able to make the strides that it has, in Afghanistan and Iraq, is because of a fluke-- a few boxes of hanging-chad ballots in Florida. More and more it appears that if it weren't for the contents of the trunk of a car in Dade County, Saddam would still today be enthroned in Baghdad, and New York might be a denuded ruin or Los Angeles a poisoned wasteland.

"But Los Angeles IS a--" Hush.

More and more it appears that what the people of this country really want is what people like Michael Moore and Peter Camejo want: apologies, capitulation, accession to the practices of the enlightened governments of Europe and Asia, and the voluntary surrender of our nation's armed might-- a gun buyback program for the United States Military-- so as to bring about true global equality and unarmed world government. The people calling in to NPR this morning on the ongoing Recall coverage show, if their sheer numbers were any indication at all, show that there's only so much propaganda we as a people can absorb from the get-the-government-overturning-scoop-or-die media before we start to believe it, facts on the ground be damned. 9/11 brought the world into sharp relief for many people-- but for nearly as many the wound scabbed over far too rapidly, forming an ugly scar as they worried it endlessly, searching for a way to take solace in ritual self-mutilation.

Next year's election will be where the final hand is dealt. It will tell us how many people in this country have been able to weather the battering of the guiltmongers and the doom-seekers and the sowers of Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt, and hold on to what we know is the right course of action for ourselves and for the world-- and how many are ready to cash in, give up, lie down and let blissful slumber overtake our eyes while the Pods placed by the social-progressive Europeans creep ever closer to our bedsides.

If Bush manages to win reelection, there's a chance. It means we have room for a much longer-term plan to be executed, a mandate to do things right in this effort to bring democracy and the rule of law at long last to the last part of the world still mired in medieval theocracy. It will spark outrage from the Left, but it'll be muted-- chastened, driven to the sidelines-- while the voices that gleefully revel in slogans like "Selected not Elected" and "Bush Lied, People Died" have to suck up the fact that they aren't being listened to, that they have no voice and no power after all. They'll have to face the fact that in order to win over a significant portion of the people of this country to your views, you have to grow up a little, walk a mile in the other man's shoes, find out what it is to live the kind of life you were raised to oppose. They'll have to understand that Americans aren't so fickle, so easily duped, so susceptible to cheap shots and low blows and infantile slogans repeated ad nauseum. They'll have to realize that America still believes, for all its faults, in America-- and it's not going to be converting itself into a clone of Canada or England or France (or, for that matter, Nazi Germany) anytime in the foreseeable future.

But if he loses... then it means the forces that have lost their faith in the American ideal, that have banked on the dream of the future they see in Star Trek, that think reality is a subjective and malleable toy that each person has free rein to knead and mold and bat around to his whim... those forces have grown strong enough to defeat those who think otherwise. It means America has changed forever, irreversibly. It means the great Experiment has failed-- the idea that the people can rule themselves, defeating the ages-old cycle of brutal dictators and evil nepotistic tyrannies and aristocratic, manufactured "culture" in favor of the true, vibrant jubilation of the common and everyday man and woman imagining a universe and changing the world, will cease to be a viable force on the global stage just as Marxist communism did.

At the time of the Civil War, Europe watched with ghoulish glee-- praying for the Confederacy to win, and so to dash to pieces this heretical idea of a Union of democratic States that could breach free of history and shame every nation that had not yet let go of its justifications for withholding governing power from its people. Lincoln, by holding the States together at the cost of nearly everything held dear up to that crowning ideal, threw humiliation to those European powers that had hoped so fervently to see America fail-- and in so doing, forced them into their own internal turmoils that led to the crashing overcorrections of nationalism and populism and elitism that eventually coalesced into the Bolsheviks and the Nazis. America got back on its course, but Europe lost its way-- and it took American resolve to put things right again.

The repercussions of WWII lead in direct lines to the Israel/Palestinian conflict, the Vietnam War, the inevitable fall of the Soviet bloc (and sudden renewed hope in Eastern Europe for greater days ahead), and the emergence of America as the world's only superpower, endowed with the ability to change anything, anywhere on the globe, that we see fit, untrammeled by any technological or practical barriers. The only thing keeping America from remaking the world in what it knows to be a successful, intoxicatingly vibrant, deeply human and enlightened image is the reluctance and self-doubt of its own people. And so fearful is that people of the specter of becoming an imperial power, even one whose only "empire" consists of an exportation of ideas, prevents us from accomplishing those goals of supreme benevolence and modernity that it has taken the planet Earth thousands of years of human history just to be able to conceive of. At long last, eight thousand years after Ur, humanity is capable of standing up, of casting away the relics of ancient days that in the absence of a power keeping watch over them divide a people between privileged overclasses and downtrodden masses; free finally of the seduction of communism and its heavy-handed, statist imposition of equality at the expense of individuality, nations can tap the potential of all of their people and become proud, modern, and free. The age of tyranny is over. All that remains is to clean up the last vestiges of it.

If only we have the courage to do so, and the will to deny that we step onto a slippery slope toward Naziism every time we speak of defeating a despotic government and freeing a people. All it takes is to look the self-doubting hordes in the eye and say, loudly, NO! We are not out to enslave the world. We are doing the exact opposite. We have the unique opportunity to do the most good that's ever been done on the face of this planet, and all you can do is pine for a fantasy world? We're doing more than any country ever did before to bring this world a little closer every day to that very fantasy... and yet you oppose it because it means in the process we might end up killing the villains who currently keep it from coming about?

The realities of a world of tyranny and subterfuge and shady backroom deals is evident nowhere as much as in the stories of what went on in Saddam's Iraq-- not least between his doomed regime and a bitter, power-hungry ex-Soviet-bloc cadre of schemers. Yet our propensity for self-doubt causes us to suspect our own government of high treason before we entertain the possibility that we might have the moral high ground, that we only look like we have egg on our faces because we don't cheat. It's that kind of paralysis-- that kind of enslavement to our worst interpretations of everything we do-- that has the opportunity to kill this country's aspirations, to bring to naught everything we've worked for all this time. No other country, indeed not even the whole rest of the world put together, can kill America. But America can commit suicide.

We have a year to prepare-- to decide the direction our sword will be pointed.


11:50 - This time the Road Cruiser is a good thing to see
http://www.arman.fm/competitions_and_giveaways.htm

(top)

Hey. Yeah. Go look at this page-- and while you're at it, check out the intro and the rest of the site-- and tell me Afghanistan is doomed to remain forever in the crapper.

ARMAN FM supports local businesses.

Do you have a favorite store in Kabul?† Maybe the best prices, range or service.† Let us know & we will let others know as well!

Contact us on bestbuys@arman.fm or 070 28 93 83 or PO BOX 1045 Central Post Office, Kabul, Afghanistan.

Sounds like... um... <gulp>

... America.
Wednesday, October 1, 2003
15:39 - Flip the switch
http://www.ejectejecteject.com/archives/000066.html

(top)
POWER is posted. (At 4:50 AM, too. Damn, he's been working hard on that one. And boy, is it ever worth it.)

How is it possible to quote from a Whittle piece? I won't do it.

Anyway, at the end he notes that Front Line Voices-- Frank J's new pet project, a showcase of letters from the soldiers and others on the ground about what's really happening in Iraq-- is open. I've been watching it prior to its official unveiling for a few days now, and it's going to merit a sidebar link, I do believe.

Bill says of the letters, "Go and read them. They will show you the kind of people -- the kind of power -- we really are far more eloquently than anything I could write." They're eloquent, yes, but Bill does sell himself short.


13:08 - Don't let this vanish into the bit-bucket
http://www.nationalreview.com/thecorner/03_09_28_corner-archive.asp#014018

(top)
At NRO's Corner and via Tim Blair, a Seussian tale that someone simply must illustrate. Or at least save; it's too good to simply go the way of the Emperor's Comments. (Heh.)

Phil Rose, a friend in Seattle, writes to ask if people around here call the president "That Bush." Writes Phil, "They don't call him 'President Bush' or even 'Bush,' but 'That Bush' as in, 'Oooooh, I hate that Bush. That Bush is mean. That Bush is stupid. That Bush spends all his time taking money away from the people and giving it to The Rich.'" Phil says he found himself wondering who this guy "The Rich" is -- if he's anything like The Donald. He started thinking of That Bush being like the Grinch, slinking from house to house, stealing purses and wallets and putting them into a huge bag for The Rich. And then Phil started to write:

THAT BUSH

The poor people dove down in Dumpsters for stuff
But The Rich, in his palace, cried "I don't have enough!
"What to do? Who to call? What button to push?
"I know! The red one that summons That Bush!"

So The Rich pushed the button, a bell chimed "Clang! Clang!"
And up popped That Bush! And That Bush said, "You rang?"

And it goes on.
Tuesday, September 30, 2003
14:59 - Beautiful
http://moveon.org/pac/recall/materials.html

(top)
Here's what MoveOn.org is now mailing around to all its subscribers, though its main page still seems bereft of recall-related links:



It's that one on the left that brings a little tear of gladness to my eye. Has the Left finally learned how to be self-effacing?

Or honest?

Monday, September 29, 2003
19:52 - Who didn't see this coming?
http://www.albawaba.com/headlines/TheNews.php3?sid=259825&lang=e&dir=entertainment

(top)
Well, this was only a matter of time.

The Jordanian official news agency Petra has reported that a member of parliament has demanded that the government prosecutes those responsible for screening the latest film "Bruce Al Mighty" by Hollywood comedian actor Jim Carey in Jordanian cinema houses. The agency, which refused to reveal the identity of the parliament member, added that an immediate order was given to stop showing the film in every movie theater.

According to the London based Elaph, it was stated that the parliament official referred to the film as an insult to God and a disgrace to all religions. Carey was also reprimanded for playing the leading role of Bruce, who in the film plays the role of a journalist who is given the powers of God Almighty and is dared to compete with God.

It's "Carrey", you humorless busybody twits.

("Bruce Al Mighty". That's even better. Maybe make it Mohammad Jim Al-Qari?)


15:27 - Don't write us off just yet
http://cnn.allpolitics.printthis.clickability.com/pt/cpt?action=cpt&expire=-1&urlID=

(top)
Damien Del Russo points this out:

When asked how they would vote on recalling Davis, 63 percent of probable voters surveyed said they would vote yes, compared with 35 percent who said they would vote no.

In a separate vote to choose a replacement for Davis, Schwarzenegger was the choice of 40 percent of respondents.

Democratic Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante was the choice for 25 percent of voters polled, Republican state Sen. Tom McClintock received 18 percent.

The poll showed Green Party candidate Peter Camejo with 5 percent and syndicated columnist and independent candidate Arianna Huffington with 2 percent of the respondents' support.

Good, good. So McClintock won't be a spoiler even if he stays in the race, because I imagine more people will throw in with Arnie as election day approaches (out of an acceptance of the reality of their comparative electabilities) than will swing to McClintock on principle. Bustamonte seems to be failing to thrill people (his numbers are barely better than McClintock's). Sure, these comparative numbers are only among those who would approve the recall (e.g. mostly Republicans), but it's refreshing to see just how little support Mr. DJ Smooth is getting. And it's even more refreshing to see that even out here in Berkeleyland, Huffington and King Camejomejo are waaaay down in the noise. California doesn't want anyone more socialist than Davis in office, thankyouverymuch.

We might just come out of this all right.

Meanwhile, in La-La Land, MoveOn.org is running an EMERGENCY! Stop Schwarzenegger! mailing campaign. Hey, good luck to 'em-- I suppose not winning a single kooky cause since Monicagate will really demoralize a group, huh?



05:18 - Return of the Trailers
http://progressive.stream.aol.com/aol/us/moviefone/movies/2003/lotr3_014381/lotr3_tr

(top)
It's here-- the Return of the King trailer. Go ye and download of it.

Previous Week...


© Brian Tiemann